Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?

There are a few differences between glass and plastic laser safety lenses—one of them involving Visible Light Transmission (VLT).

Better VLT with Glass Laser Safety Goggles

Glass Laser Safety GogglesGlass is heavier but more scratch-resistant than plastic, and plastic is less expensive and available in more frames. One thing, though, that may seem less intuitive is the fact that glass laser safety lenses generally have higher visual light transmission, or VLT, than their plastic counterparts. This is largely due to the process by which the lenses are colored and dyed to block specific wavelengths of laser radiation. As could be imagined, molten glass is harder to work with than liquid plastics.

Here are a few things that differentiate glass from plastic in laser safety goggles:

  • The materials used to dye glass are different from those used to dye plastics. Generally, glass is dyed using  minerals and earth metals, as opposed to the synthetic dyes used in plastics. These materials often inherently block less visual light than synthetic dyes do.
  • Because the minerals and earth metals used to dye glass are more expensive than synthetic dyes, glass lenses are often more expensive than plastic lenses.
  • The process of dying glass is also more costly as it has to happen at extreme temperatures using special machinery.
  • Because most synthetic dyes cannot survive the process of mixture into molten glass, plastic is more versatile at many wavelengths because it can accept more dyes than glass.
  • There are several different groups of laser lenses that have coverage to block the same laser. Within each of these groups or categories of lenses, there may be glass and plastic. The glass lens will almost always be more expensive and have higher visual light transmission than plastic.
  • Plastic lenses generally can’t be adhered to each other or combined, except that their dyes can often be combined in manufacturing. Glass laser lenses can be adjusted for thickness and they can often be adhered or laminated to each other to create a “combination” filter.
  • Plastic is easier to edge than glass, so it’s often available in more frame types than glass is.

When it comes to laser safety, there are certain glass lenses that are very good. They have very high visual light transmission (above 50) and offer coverage at a variety of wavelengths with optical densities above 5 or even 7. This allows you to work with clear, unimpeded vision while being very safe from laser radiation. On the other hand, there are some lasers that have a variety of different lenses offered to protect you from them. Your choice of laser filter should depend upon your lighting conditions, need for clear vision while your laser is in use, and budget.

A good rule of thumb is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the glasses while it performs a task without the need for you to guide it, VLT is less important and can be sacrificed for budget or the light weight of plastic. Where applicable, it is vital to follow the direction of a laser safety officer when deciding between laser safety goggles.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

As always, safety should be your first priority when shopping for laser safety goggles, so stay safe and thanks for reading!

4 Responses to Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?
  1. [...] Transmittance, or the amount of light that passes through a lens, is a decimal fraction of the total light you started with. So if a lens transmits 0.01% of the light at a specified wavelength, its decimal fraction transmittance, or T, would be 0.00001. [...]

  2. [...] lasers operate at a large variety of wavelengths, from 190 to over 10,000 nanometers. The visible light spectrum, on the other hand, falls roughly between 400 and 700 nanometers. Coverage of wavelengths outside [...]

  3. [...] Visible light transmission, or VLT, is also crucial for laser safety goggles in use during medical procedures. When you’re performing real-time dental, surgical, or corrective/reparative work on a patient, you need the best vision possible to ensure that you perform your work well and efficiently. Laser safety glasses with high VLT will ensure the best working conditions possible. [...]

  4. [...] laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/why-do-glass-laser-safety-goggles-have-better-vlt/trackback/

Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?

There are a few differences between glass and plastic laser safety lenses—one of them involving Visible Light Transmission (VLT).

Better VLT with Glass Laser Safety Goggles

Glass Laser Safety GogglesGlass is heavier but more scratch-resistant than plastic, and plastic is less expensive and available in more frames. One thing, though, that may seem less intuitive is the fact that glass laser safety lenses generally have higher visual light transmission, or VLT, than their plastic counterparts. This is largely due to the process by which the lenses are colored and dyed to block specific wavelengths of laser radiation. As could be imagined, molten glass is harder to work with than liquid plastics.

Here are a few things that differentiate glass from plastic in laser safety goggles:

  • The materials used to dye glass are different from those used to dye plastics. Generally, glass is dyed using  minerals and earth metals, as opposed to the synthetic dyes used in plastics. These materials often inherently block less visual light than synthetic dyes do.
  • Because the minerals and earth metals used to dye glass are more expensive than synthetic dyes, glass lenses are often more expensive than plastic lenses.
  • The process of dying glass is also more costly as it has to happen at extreme temperatures using special machinery.
  • Because most synthetic dyes cannot survive the process of mixture into molten glass, plastic is more versatile at many wavelengths because it can accept more dyes than glass.
  • There are several different groups of laser lenses that have coverage to block the same laser. Within each of these groups or categories of lenses, there may be glass and plastic. The glass lens will almost always be more expensive and have higher visual light transmission than plastic.
  • Plastic lenses generally can’t be adhered to each other or combined, except that their dyes can often be combined in manufacturing. Glass laser lenses can be adjusted for thickness and they can often be adhered or laminated to each other to create a “combination” filter.
  • Plastic is easier to edge than glass, so it’s often available in more frame types than glass is.

When it comes to laser safety, there are certain glass lenses that are very good. They have very high visual light transmission (above 50) and offer coverage at a variety of wavelengths with optical densities above 5 or even 7. This allows you to work with clear, unimpeded vision while being very safe from laser radiation. On the other hand, there are some lasers that have a variety of different lenses offered to protect you from them. Your choice of laser filter should depend upon your lighting conditions, need for clear vision while your laser is in use, and budget.

A good rule of thumb is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the glasses while it performs a task without the need for you to guide it, VLT is less important and can be sacrificed for budget or the light weight of plastic. Where applicable, it is vital to follow the direction of a laser safety officer when deciding between laser safety goggles.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

As always, safety should be your first priority when shopping for laser safety goggles, so stay safe and thanks for reading!

4 Responses to Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?
  1. [...] Transmittance, or the amount of light that passes through a lens, is a decimal fraction of the total light you started with. So if a lens transmits 0.01% of the light at a specified wavelength, its decimal fraction transmittance, or T, would be 0.00001. [...]

  2. [...] lasers operate at a large variety of wavelengths, from 190 to over 10,000 nanometers. The visible light spectrum, on the other hand, falls roughly between 400 and 700 nanometers. Coverage of wavelengths outside [...]

  3. [...] Visible light transmission, or VLT, is also crucial for laser safety goggles in use during medical procedures. When you’re performing real-time dental, surgical, or corrective/reparative work on a patient, you need the best vision possible to ensure that you perform your work well and efficiently. Laser safety glasses with high VLT will ensure the best working conditions possible. [...]

  4. [...] laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/why-do-glass-laser-safety-goggles-have-better-vlt/trackback/

Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?

There are a few differences between glass and plastic laser safety lenses—one of them involving Visible Light Transmission (VLT).

Better VLT with Glass Laser Safety Goggles

Glass Laser Safety GogglesGlass is heavier but more scratch-resistant than plastic, and plastic is less expensive and available in more frames. One thing, though, that may seem less intuitive is the fact that glass laser safety lenses generally have higher visual light transmission, or VLT, than their plastic counterparts. This is largely due to the process by which the lenses are colored and dyed to block specific wavelengths of laser radiation. As could be imagined, molten glass is harder to work with than liquid plastics.

Here are a few things that differentiate glass from plastic in laser safety goggles:

  • The materials used to dye glass are different from those used to dye plastics. Generally, glass is dyed using  minerals and earth metals, as opposed to the synthetic dyes used in plastics. These materials often inherently block less visual light than synthetic dyes do.
  • Because the minerals and earth metals used to dye glass are more expensive than synthetic dyes, glass lenses are often more expensive than plastic lenses.
  • The process of dying glass is also more costly as it has to happen at extreme temperatures using special machinery.
  • Because most synthetic dyes cannot survive the process of mixture into molten glass, plastic is more versatile at many wavelengths because it can accept more dyes than glass.
  • There are several different groups of laser lenses that have coverage to block the same laser. Within each of these groups or categories of lenses, there may be glass and plastic. The glass lens will almost always be more expensive and have higher visual light transmission than plastic.
  • Plastic lenses generally can’t be adhered to each other or combined, except that their dyes can often be combined in manufacturing. Glass laser lenses can be adjusted for thickness and they can often be adhered or laminated to each other to create a “combination” filter.
  • Plastic is easier to edge than glass, so it’s often available in more frame types than glass is.

When it comes to laser safety, there are certain glass lenses that are very good. They have very high visual light transmission (above 50) and offer coverage at a variety of wavelengths with optical densities above 5 or even 7. This allows you to work with clear, unimpeded vision while being very safe from laser radiation. On the other hand, there are some lasers that have a variety of different lenses offered to protect you from them. Your choice of laser filter should depend upon your lighting conditions, need for clear vision while your laser is in use, and budget.

A good rule of thumb is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the glasses while it performs a task without the need for you to guide it, VLT is less important and can be sacrificed for budget or the light weight of plastic. Where applicable, it is vital to follow the direction of a laser safety officer when deciding between laser safety goggles.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

As always, safety should be your first priority when shopping for laser safety goggles, so stay safe and thanks for reading!

4 Responses to Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?
  1. [...] Transmittance, or the amount of light that passes through a lens, is a decimal fraction of the total light you started with. So if a lens transmits 0.01% of the light at a specified wavelength, its decimal fraction transmittance, or T, would be 0.00001. [...]

  2. [...] lasers operate at a large variety of wavelengths, from 190 to over 10,000 nanometers. The visible light spectrum, on the other hand, falls roughly between 400 and 700 nanometers. Coverage of wavelengths outside [...]

  3. [...] Visible light transmission, or VLT, is also crucial for laser safety goggles in use during medical procedures. When you’re performing real-time dental, surgical, or corrective/reparative work on a patient, you need the best vision possible to ensure that you perform your work well and efficiently. Laser safety glasses with high VLT will ensure the best working conditions possible. [...]

  4. [...] laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/why-do-glass-laser-safety-goggles-have-better-vlt/trackback/

Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?

There are a few differences between glass and plastic laser safety lenses—one of them involving Visible Light Transmission (VLT).

Better VLT with Glass Laser Safety Goggles

Glass Laser Safety GogglesGlass is heavier but more scratch-resistant than plastic, and plastic is less expensive and available in more frames. One thing, though, that may seem less intuitive is the fact that glass laser safety lenses generally have higher visual light transmission, or VLT, than their plastic counterparts. This is largely due to the process by which the lenses are colored and dyed to block specific wavelengths of laser radiation. As could be imagined, molten glass is harder to work with than liquid plastics.

Here are a few things that differentiate glass from plastic in laser safety goggles:

  • The materials used to dye glass are different from those used to dye plastics. Generally, glass is dyed using  minerals and earth metals, as opposed to the synthetic dyes used in plastics. These materials often inherently block less visual light than synthetic dyes do.
  • Because the minerals and earth metals used to dye glass are more expensive than synthetic dyes, glass lenses are often more expensive than plastic lenses.
  • The process of dying glass is also more costly as it has to happen at extreme temperatures using special machinery.
  • Because most synthetic dyes cannot survive the process of mixture into molten glass, plastic is more versatile at many wavelengths because it can accept more dyes than glass.
  • There are several different groups of laser lenses that have coverage to block the same laser. Within each of these groups or categories of lenses, there may be glass and plastic. The glass lens will almost always be more expensive and have higher visual light transmission than plastic.
  • Plastic lenses generally can’t be adhered to each other or combined, except that their dyes can often be combined in manufacturing. Glass laser lenses can be adjusted for thickness and they can often be adhered or laminated to each other to create a “combination” filter.
  • Plastic is easier to edge than glass, so it’s often available in more frame types than glass is.

When it comes to laser safety, there are certain glass lenses that are very good. They have very high visual light transmission (above 50) and offer coverage at a variety of wavelengths with optical densities above 5 or even 7. This allows you to work with clear, unimpeded vision while being very safe from laser radiation. On the other hand, there are some lasers that have a variety of different lenses offered to protect you from them. Your choice of laser filter should depend upon your lighting conditions, need for clear vision while your laser is in use, and budget.

A good rule of thumb is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the glasses while it performs a task without the need for you to guide it, VLT is less important and can be sacrificed for budget or the light weight of plastic. Where applicable, it is vital to follow the direction of a laser safety officer when deciding between laser safety goggles.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

As always, safety should be your first priority when shopping for laser safety goggles, so stay safe and thanks for reading!

4 Responses to Why Do Glass Laser Safety Goggles Have Better VLT?
  1. [...] Transmittance, or the amount of light that passes through a lens, is a decimal fraction of the total light you started with. So if a lens transmits 0.01% of the light at a specified wavelength, its decimal fraction transmittance, or T, would be 0.00001. [...]

  2. [...] lasers operate at a large variety of wavelengths, from 190 to over 10,000 nanometers. The visible light spectrum, on the other hand, falls roughly between 400 and 700 nanometers. Coverage of wavelengths outside [...]

  3. [...] Visible light transmission, or VLT, is also crucial for laser safety goggles in use during medical procedures. When you’re performing real-time dental, surgical, or corrective/reparative work on a patient, you need the best vision possible to ensure that you perform your work well and efficiently. Laser safety glasses with high VLT will ensure the best working conditions possible. [...]

  4. [...] laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/why-do-glass-laser-safety-goggles-have-better-vlt/trackback/