The Reason Why Pilots Need to Wear Laser Safety Glasses

Lately there has been much discussion about whether pilots need to wear laser safety glasses, and if so, why this is believed to be the case. The answer to this much-discussed question is yes, pilots absolutely do need to be wearing safety glasses or goggles in high-risk situations, and they should keep a pair handy at all times. The reason for this is the unfortunate reality that has only recently become a common concern: laser attacks on aircraft of all kinds. 

Because laser pointers are so affordable and easily-accessible, almost anyone can get their hands on one these days. These little lights are powerful, and have the ability to seriously damage the eyesight of anyone who suffers a direct hit in the eye by one. The green lasers are the most powerful, and unfortunately, seem to be the most popular color when it comes to laser strikes on aircraft.

Many individuals have taken to pointing the lights at passing aircraft as a sort of real-life video game. This “game” seems to be most popular with male teenagers and men in their 30s. While most attackers are doing this purely for entertainment—likely without even realizing the consequences—a few are true criminals protesting specific companies, organizations, or branches of the government.

In either case, the act of pointing a laser beam at any kind of airborne vehicle is a serious crime—breaking a law passed in 2012—and is punishable by up to $10,000 in fines, as well as up to five years in prison.

While people with laser pointers may have gotten away with pointing them to the sky in the past, this is no longer the case. The FBI is seriously cracking down and going after these laser beam hooligans and criminals. It is easier than ever for pilots to report laser attacks, and they are doing so much more often than in the past. Because of these reports, and with the use of a helicopter, a dispatcher, and squad cars the perpetrators are often caught. Additionally, the FBI is offering up rewards to anyone who can offer tips about where one of these laser pointing pranksters might be.

While the FBI may be cracking down on those who are pointing their lasers at planes, there is very little regulation when it comes to who purchases these powerful little laser lights. For this reason, it is unlikely these laser strikes will disappear completely unless someone steps in to regulate the people purchasing laser lights. Until then, we will likely continue to see laser attacks on planes and helicopters on a regular basis, making it necessary for pilots to continue to protect themselves in whatever way they can.

Because most of the people pointing laser beams to the sky are doing so at random and as a game, pilots of all sorts—including commercial, military, and law enforcement, to name a few—are subject to these attacks. These attacks are not only annoying, but also very dangerous. The incredibly bright light shining into the cockpit can cause temporary blindness, resulting in a frightening and unsafe situation for anyone in the affected pilot’s aircraft. Furthermore, if a person suffers a direct hit from a laser pointer it could potentially burn the victim’s cornea and land them in the hospital, causing them pain and suffering as well as time missed at work. These attacks are not a game for pilots or their passengers, but a serious and dangerous event.

Safety eyewear can prevent most of the negative effects of these laser beam attacks by blocking up to 99.5% of a laser’s light depending on the lens worn and the color of the laser. This eliminates all glare and protects the eyes of the wearer, but leaves just enough of the laser visible to aid in locating the perpetrator. It is important to note that cockpit lights are not affected, nor is color recognition degraded, meaning these lenses can be worn perfectly safely without any negative effects.

Choosing aviation-specific eyewear is very important when deciding what kind of glasses will be worn. Regular sunglasses, “blue blocker” glasses, and laser safety glasses made for laboratory use and not specified for use in aviation should be avoided due to the potential for unsafe situations when wearing glasses such as these. Wearing ordinary sunglasses in the evening, early morning, or at night—when most laser attacks occur—will cause the pilot’s vision to be obstructed as there is not enough sunlight to see clearly through the lenses of sunglasses. “Blue blocker” glasses affect the ability to properly see blue and green light which can make it difficult to properly view cockpit instruments and airport lights. Lastly, glasses made for laboratory laser safety may block out too many colors or may not protect against the most common colors of laser pointers.

For all of these reasons it is clearly imperative that eyewear made for the specific purpose of protecting pilots from laser attacks is worn as opposed to eyewear made for other purposes.

If you fly any kind of aircraft, it is important that you educate yourself on the eyewear you need to keep yourself and your passengers safe. We at Phillips Safety Products offer aviation-specific laser safety lenses in a variety of different frames to suit your tastes. We would love to help keep you safe by offering our recommendations and advice. If you have any questions feel free to contact us. We would be happy to assist you!

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The Reason Why Pilots Need to Wear Laser Safety Glasses

Lately there has been much discussion about whether pilots need to wear laser safety glasses, and if so, why this is believed to be the case. The answer to this much-discussed question is yes, pilots absolutely do need to be wearing safety glasses or goggles in high-risk situations, and they should keep a pair handy at all times. The reason for this is the unfortunate reality that has only recently become a common concern: laser attacks on aircraft of all kinds. 

Because laser pointers are so affordable and easily-accessible, almost anyone can get their hands on one these days. These little lights are powerful, and have the ability to seriously damage the eyesight of anyone who suffers a direct hit in the eye by one. The green lasers are the most powerful, and unfortunately, seem to be the most popular color when it comes to laser strikes on aircraft.

Many individuals have taken to pointing the lights at passing aircraft as a sort of real-life video game. This “game” seems to be most popular with male teenagers and men in their 30s. While most attackers are doing this purely for entertainment—likely without even realizing the consequences—a few are true criminals protesting specific companies, organizations, or branches of the government.

In either case, the act of pointing a laser beam at any kind of airborne vehicle is a serious crime—breaking a law passed in 2012—and is punishable by up to $10,000 in fines, as well as up to five years in prison.

While people with laser pointers may have gotten away with pointing them to the sky in the past, this is no longer the case. The FBI is seriously cracking down and going after these laser beam hooligans and criminals. It is easier than ever for pilots to report laser attacks, and they are doing so much more often than in the past. Because of these reports, and with the use of a helicopter, a dispatcher, and squad cars the perpetrators are often caught. Additionally, the FBI is offering up rewards to anyone who can offer tips about where one of these laser pointing pranksters might be.

While the FBI may be cracking down on those who are pointing their lasers at planes, there is very little regulation when it comes to who purchases these powerful little laser lights. For this reason, it is unlikely these laser strikes will disappear completely unless someone steps in to regulate the people purchasing laser lights. Until then, we will likely continue to see laser attacks on planes and helicopters on a regular basis, making it necessary for pilots to continue to protect themselves in whatever way they can.

Because most of the people pointing laser beams to the sky are doing so at random and as a game, pilots of all sorts—including commercial, military, and law enforcement, to name a few—are subject to these attacks. These attacks are not only annoying, but also very dangerous. The incredibly bright light shining into the cockpit can cause temporary blindness, resulting in a frightening and unsafe situation for anyone in the affected pilot’s aircraft. Furthermore, if a person suffers a direct hit from a laser pointer it could potentially burn the victim’s cornea and land them in the hospital, causing them pain and suffering as well as time missed at work. These attacks are not a game for pilots or their passengers, but a serious and dangerous event.

Safety eyewear can prevent most of the negative effects of these laser beam attacks by blocking up to 99.5% of a laser’s light depending on the lens worn and the color of the laser. This eliminates all glare and protects the eyes of the wearer, but leaves just enough of the laser visible to aid in locating the perpetrator. It is important to note that cockpit lights are not affected, nor is color recognition degraded, meaning these lenses can be worn perfectly safely without any negative effects.

Choosing aviation-specific eyewear is very important when deciding what kind of glasses will be worn. Regular sunglasses, “blue blocker” glasses, and laser safety glasses made for laboratory use and not specified for use in aviation should be avoided due to the potential for unsafe situations when wearing glasses such as these. Wearing ordinary sunglasses in the evening, early morning, or at night—when most laser attacks occur—will cause the pilot’s vision to be obstructed as there is not enough sunlight to see clearly through the lenses of sunglasses. “Blue blocker” glasses affect the ability to properly see blue and green light which can make it difficult to properly view cockpit instruments and airport lights. Lastly, glasses made for laboratory laser safety may block out too many colors or may not protect against the most common colors of laser pointers.

For all of these reasons it is clearly imperative that eyewear made for the specific purpose of protecting pilots from laser attacks is worn as opposed to eyewear made for other purposes.

If you fly any kind of aircraft, it is important that you educate yourself on the eyewear you need to keep yourself and your passengers safe. We at Phillips Safety Products offer aviation-specific laser safety lenses in a variety of different frames to suit your tastes. We would love to help keep you safe by offering our recommendations and advice. If you have any questions feel free to contact us. We would be happy to assist you!

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The Reason Why Pilots Need to Wear Laser Safety Glasses

Lately there has been much discussion about whether pilots need to wear laser safety glasses, and if so, why this is believed to be the case. The answer to this much-discussed question is yes, pilots absolutely do need to be wearing safety glasses or goggles in high-risk situations, and they should keep a pair handy at all times. The reason for this is the unfortunate reality that has only recently become a common concern: laser attacks on aircraft of all kinds. 

Because laser pointers are so affordable and easily-accessible, almost anyone can get their hands on one these days. These little lights are powerful, and have the ability to seriously damage the eyesight of anyone who suffers a direct hit in the eye by one. The green lasers are the most powerful, and unfortunately, seem to be the most popular color when it comes to laser strikes on aircraft.

Many individuals have taken to pointing the lights at passing aircraft as a sort of real-life video game. This “game” seems to be most popular with male teenagers and men in their 30s. While most attackers are doing this purely for entertainment—likely without even realizing the consequences—a few are true criminals protesting specific companies, organizations, or branches of the government.

In either case, the act of pointing a laser beam at any kind of airborne vehicle is a serious crime—breaking a law passed in 2012—and is punishable by up to $10,000 in fines, as well as up to five years in prison.

While people with laser pointers may have gotten away with pointing them to the sky in the past, this is no longer the case. The FBI is seriously cracking down and going after these laser beam hooligans and criminals. It is easier than ever for pilots to report laser attacks, and they are doing so much more often than in the past. Because of these reports, and with the use of a helicopter, a dispatcher, and squad cars the perpetrators are often caught. Additionally, the FBI is offering up rewards to anyone who can offer tips about where one of these laser pointing pranksters might be.

While the FBI may be cracking down on those who are pointing their lasers at planes, there is very little regulation when it comes to who purchases these powerful little laser lights. For this reason, it is unlikely these laser strikes will disappear completely unless someone steps in to regulate the people purchasing laser lights. Until then, we will likely continue to see laser attacks on planes and helicopters on a regular basis, making it necessary for pilots to continue to protect themselves in whatever way they can.

Because most of the people pointing laser beams to the sky are doing so at random and as a game, pilots of all sorts—including commercial, military, and law enforcement, to name a few—are subject to these attacks. These attacks are not only annoying, but also very dangerous. The incredibly bright light shining into the cockpit can cause temporary blindness, resulting in a frightening and unsafe situation for anyone in the affected pilot’s aircraft. Furthermore, if a person suffers a direct hit from a laser pointer it could potentially burn the victim’s cornea and land them in the hospital, causing them pain and suffering as well as time missed at work. These attacks are not a game for pilots or their passengers, but a serious and dangerous event.

Safety eyewear can prevent most of the negative effects of these laser beam attacks by blocking up to 99.5% of a laser’s light depending on the lens worn and the color of the laser. This eliminates all glare and protects the eyes of the wearer, but leaves just enough of the laser visible to aid in locating the perpetrator. It is important to note that cockpit lights are not affected, nor is color recognition degraded, meaning these lenses can be worn perfectly safely without any negative effects.

Choosing aviation-specific eyewear is very important when deciding what kind of glasses will be worn. Regular sunglasses, “blue blocker” glasses, and laser safety glasses made for laboratory use and not specified for use in aviation should be avoided due to the potential for unsafe situations when wearing glasses such as these. Wearing ordinary sunglasses in the evening, early morning, or at night—when most laser attacks occur—will cause the pilot’s vision to be obstructed as there is not enough sunlight to see clearly through the lenses of sunglasses. “Blue blocker” glasses affect the ability to properly see blue and green light which can make it difficult to properly view cockpit instruments and airport lights. Lastly, glasses made for laboratory laser safety may block out too many colors or may not protect against the most common colors of laser pointers.

For all of these reasons it is clearly imperative that eyewear made for the specific purpose of protecting pilots from laser attacks is worn as opposed to eyewear made for other purposes.

If you fly any kind of aircraft, it is important that you educate yourself on the eyewear you need to keep yourself and your passengers safe. We at Phillips Safety Products offer aviation-specific laser safety lenses in a variety of different frames to suit your tastes. We would love to help keep you safe by offering our recommendations and advice. If you have any questions feel free to contact us. We would be happy to assist you!

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The Reason Why Pilots Need to Wear Laser Safety Glasses

Lately there has been much discussion about whether pilots need to wear laser safety glasses, and if so, why this is believed to be the case. The answer to this much-discussed question is yes, pilots absolutely do need to be wearing safety glasses or goggles in high-risk situations, and they should keep a pair handy at all times. The reason for this is the unfortunate reality that has only recently become a common concern: laser attacks on aircraft of all kinds. 

Because laser pointers are so affordable and easily-accessible, almost anyone can get their hands on one these days. These little lights are powerful, and have the ability to seriously damage the eyesight of anyone who suffers a direct hit in the eye by one. The green lasers are the most powerful, and unfortunately, seem to be the most popular color when it comes to laser strikes on aircraft.

Many individuals have taken to pointing the lights at passing aircraft as a sort of real-life video game. This “game” seems to be most popular with male teenagers and men in their 30s. While most attackers are doing this purely for entertainment—likely without even realizing the consequences—a few are true criminals protesting specific companies, organizations, or branches of the government.

In either case, the act of pointing a laser beam at any kind of airborne vehicle is a serious crime—breaking a law passed in 2012—and is punishable by up to $10,000 in fines, as well as up to five years in prison.

While people with laser pointers may have gotten away with pointing them to the sky in the past, this is no longer the case. The FBI is seriously cracking down and going after these laser beam hooligans and criminals. It is easier than ever for pilots to report laser attacks, and they are doing so much more often than in the past. Because of these reports, and with the use of a helicopter, a dispatcher, and squad cars the perpetrators are often caught. Additionally, the FBI is offering up rewards to anyone who can offer tips about where one of these laser pointing pranksters might be.

While the FBI may be cracking down on those who are pointing their lasers at planes, there is very little regulation when it comes to who purchases these powerful little laser lights. For this reason, it is unlikely these laser strikes will disappear completely unless someone steps in to regulate the people purchasing laser lights. Until then, we will likely continue to see laser attacks on planes and helicopters on a regular basis, making it necessary for pilots to continue to protect themselves in whatever way they can.

Because most of the people pointing laser beams to the sky are doing so at random and as a game, pilots of all sorts—including commercial, military, and law enforcement, to name a few—are subject to these attacks. These attacks are not only annoying, but also very dangerous. The incredibly bright light shining into the cockpit can cause temporary blindness, resulting in a frightening and unsafe situation for anyone in the affected pilot’s aircraft. Furthermore, if a person suffers a direct hit from a laser pointer it could potentially burn the victim’s cornea and land them in the hospital, causing them pain and suffering as well as time missed at work. These attacks are not a game for pilots or their passengers, but a serious and dangerous event.

Safety eyewear can prevent most of the negative effects of these laser beam attacks by blocking up to 99.5% of a laser’s light depending on the lens worn and the color of the laser. This eliminates all glare and protects the eyes of the wearer, but leaves just enough of the laser visible to aid in locating the perpetrator. It is important to note that cockpit lights are not affected, nor is color recognition degraded, meaning these lenses can be worn perfectly safely without any negative effects.

Choosing aviation-specific eyewear is very important when deciding what kind of glasses will be worn. Regular sunglasses, “blue blocker” glasses, and laser safety glasses made for laboratory use and not specified for use in aviation should be avoided due to the potential for unsafe situations when wearing glasses such as these. Wearing ordinary sunglasses in the evening, early morning, or at night—when most laser attacks occur—will cause the pilot’s vision to be obstructed as there is not enough sunlight to see clearly through the lenses of sunglasses. “Blue blocker” glasses affect the ability to properly see blue and green light which can make it difficult to properly view cockpit instruments and airport lights. Lastly, glasses made for laboratory laser safety may block out too many colors or may not protect against the most common colors of laser pointers.

For all of these reasons it is clearly imperative that eyewear made for the specific purpose of protecting pilots from laser attacks is worn as opposed to eyewear made for other purposes.

If you fly any kind of aircraft, it is important that you educate yourself on the eyewear you need to keep yourself and your passengers safe. We at Phillips Safety Products offer aviation-specific laser safety lenses in a variety of different frames to suit your tastes. We would love to help keep you safe by offering our recommendations and advice. If you have any questions feel free to contact us. We would be happy to assist you!

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