Laser Safety Glasses Infrared

Infrared Radiation, or IR, is an invisible electromagnetic radiation that is generated by light that lies within the range of .0780nm to 1000nm.

Infrared Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses InfraredThese wavelengths are often broken up into three regions: Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm), Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm), and Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm). All wavelengths within the IR spectrum are longer than those of visible light, hence the “invisible” designation.

IR is a natural by-product of light and heat. More than half of the thermal radiation cast off by the sun, for instance, is infrared. Over prolonged periods of exposure to low levels of IR, burns to the skin and damage to eye tissue is known to occur. Identical damage occurs to short periods of exposure to concentrated levels of IR, such as the output of certain lasers. These burns can cause temporary or permanent eye damage, up to and including complete vision loss. This is the reason that eye protection when in the vicinity of an in-use laser is absolutely essential.

According to Section III: Chapter 6 of OSHA’s Laser Hazards Technical Manual, here is the summary of basic biological effects of light on the eye as it applies to infrared:

  • Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm) causes skin burn, cataract, retinal burns
  • Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm) causes skin burn, corneal burn, aqueous flare, IR cataract
  • Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm) causes skin burn, and corneal burn

The same chapter also features the following notations featuring facts about infrared exposure:

  • Ten seconds is the time period chosen by the ANSI Z136.1 committees and represents the optimum “worst case” time period for ocular exposures to infrared (principally near-infrared) laser sources. It was argued that natural eye motions dominate for periods longer than ten seconds.
  • The thermal damage process (burns) is generally associated with lasers operating at exposure times greater than 10 microseconds and in the wavelength region from the near ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.315 nm – 103 nm). Tissue damage may also be caused by thermally induced acoustic waves following exposures to sub-microsecond laser exposures.

Shop IR Laser Safety GlassesLasers that operate in the IR spectrum are commonly used for many medical, scientific, and industrial applications. Protective laser safety eyewear is available in numerous formats and styles from Phillips Safety Products. If you or your clients, patients, or personnel run the risk of exposure to IR lasers, contact Phillips for information and pricing on laser safety glasses or goggles that provide filtering for your unique laser applications.

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Laser Safety Glasses Infrared

Infrared Radiation, or IR, is an invisible electromagnetic radiation that is generated by light that lies within the range of .0780nm to 1000nm.

Infrared Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses InfraredThese wavelengths are often broken up into three regions: Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm), Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm), and Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm). All wavelengths within the IR spectrum are longer than those of visible light, hence the “invisible” designation.

IR is a natural by-product of light and heat. More than half of the thermal radiation cast off by the sun, for instance, is infrared. Over prolonged periods of exposure to low levels of IR, burns to the skin and damage to eye tissue is known to occur. Identical damage occurs to short periods of exposure to concentrated levels of IR, such as the output of certain lasers. These burns can cause temporary or permanent eye damage, up to and including complete vision loss. This is the reason that eye protection when in the vicinity of an in-use laser is absolutely essential.

According to Section III: Chapter 6 of OSHA’s Laser Hazards Technical Manual, here is the summary of basic biological effects of light on the eye as it applies to infrared:

  • Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm) causes skin burn, cataract, retinal burns
  • Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm) causes skin burn, corneal burn, aqueous flare, IR cataract
  • Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm) causes skin burn, and corneal burn

The same chapter also features the following notations featuring facts about infrared exposure:

  • Ten seconds is the time period chosen by the ANSI Z136.1 committees and represents the optimum “worst case” time period for ocular exposures to infrared (principally near-infrared) laser sources. It was argued that natural eye motions dominate for periods longer than ten seconds.
  • The thermal damage process (burns) is generally associated with lasers operating at exposure times greater than 10 microseconds and in the wavelength region from the near ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.315 nm – 103 nm). Tissue damage may also be caused by thermally induced acoustic waves following exposures to sub-microsecond laser exposures.

Shop IR Laser Safety GlassesLasers that operate in the IR spectrum are commonly used for many medical, scientific, and industrial applications. Protective laser safety eyewear is available in numerous formats and styles from Phillips Safety Products. If you or your clients, patients, or personnel run the risk of exposure to IR lasers, contact Phillips for information and pricing on laser safety glasses or goggles that provide filtering for your unique laser applications.

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Laser Safety Glasses Infrared

Infrared Radiation, or IR, is an invisible electromagnetic radiation that is generated by light that lies within the range of .0780nm to 1000nm.

Infrared Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses InfraredThese wavelengths are often broken up into three regions: Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm), Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm), and Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm). All wavelengths within the IR spectrum are longer than those of visible light, hence the “invisible” designation.

IR is a natural by-product of light and heat. More than half of the thermal radiation cast off by the sun, for instance, is infrared. Over prolonged periods of exposure to low levels of IR, burns to the skin and damage to eye tissue is known to occur. Identical damage occurs to short periods of exposure to concentrated levels of IR, such as the output of certain lasers. These burns can cause temporary or permanent eye damage, up to and including complete vision loss. This is the reason that eye protection when in the vicinity of an in-use laser is absolutely essential.

According to Section III: Chapter 6 of OSHA’s Laser Hazards Technical Manual, here is the summary of basic biological effects of light on the eye as it applies to infrared:

  • Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm) causes skin burn, cataract, retinal burns
  • Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm) causes skin burn, corneal burn, aqueous flare, IR cataract
  • Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm) causes skin burn, and corneal burn

The same chapter also features the following notations featuring facts about infrared exposure:

  • Ten seconds is the time period chosen by the ANSI Z136.1 committees and represents the optimum “worst case” time period for ocular exposures to infrared (principally near-infrared) laser sources. It was argued that natural eye motions dominate for periods longer than ten seconds.
  • The thermal damage process (burns) is generally associated with lasers operating at exposure times greater than 10 microseconds and in the wavelength region from the near ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.315 nm – 103 nm). Tissue damage may also be caused by thermally induced acoustic waves following exposures to sub-microsecond laser exposures.

Shop IR Laser Safety GlassesLasers that operate in the IR spectrum are commonly used for many medical, scientific, and industrial applications. Protective laser safety eyewear is available in numerous formats and styles from Phillips Safety Products. If you or your clients, patients, or personnel run the risk of exposure to IR lasers, contact Phillips for information and pricing on laser safety glasses or goggles that provide filtering for your unique laser applications.

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-safety-glasses-infrared/trackback/

Laser Safety Glasses Infrared

Infrared Radiation, or IR, is an invisible electromagnetic radiation that is generated by light that lies within the range of .0780nm to 1000nm.

Infrared Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses InfraredThese wavelengths are often broken up into three regions: Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm), Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm), and Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm). All wavelengths within the IR spectrum are longer than those of visible light, hence the “invisible” designation.

IR is a natural by-product of light and heat. More than half of the thermal radiation cast off by the sun, for instance, is infrared. Over prolonged periods of exposure to low levels of IR, burns to the skin and damage to eye tissue is known to occur. Identical damage occurs to short periods of exposure to concentrated levels of IR, such as the output of certain lasers. These burns can cause temporary or permanent eye damage, up to and including complete vision loss. This is the reason that eye protection when in the vicinity of an in-use laser is absolutely essential.

According to Section III: Chapter 6 of OSHA’s Laser Hazards Technical Manual, here is the summary of basic biological effects of light on the eye as it applies to infrared:

  • Infrared A (0.780 – 1.400 nm) causes skin burn, cataract, retinal burns
  • Infrared B (1.400 – 3.00 nm) causes skin burn, corneal burn, aqueous flare, IR cataract
  • Infrared C (3.00 – 1000 nm) causes skin burn, and corneal burn

The same chapter also features the following notations featuring facts about infrared exposure:

  • Ten seconds is the time period chosen by the ANSI Z136.1 committees and represents the optimum “worst case” time period for ocular exposures to infrared (principally near-infrared) laser sources. It was argued that natural eye motions dominate for periods longer than ten seconds.
  • The thermal damage process (burns) is generally associated with lasers operating at exposure times greater than 10 microseconds and in the wavelength region from the near ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.315 nm – 103 nm). Tissue damage may also be caused by thermally induced acoustic waves following exposures to sub-microsecond laser exposures.

Shop IR Laser Safety GlassesLasers that operate in the IR spectrum are commonly used for many medical, scientific, and industrial applications. Protective laser safety eyewear is available in numerous formats and styles from Phillips Safety Products. If you or your clients, patients, or personnel run the risk of exposure to IR lasers, contact Phillips for information and pricing on laser safety glasses or goggles that provide filtering for your unique laser applications.

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