Laser Safety Glasses for Coast Guard

Thanks to news reports of laser pointer attacks on airplane pilots during take-off or landing, most people associate laser eye strikes with the airline industry.

Coast Guard Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses for Coast GuardIn truth, many industries, as well as branches of the government, are at risk from accidental or intentional laser exposure. The U.S. Coast Guard is certainly no exception, and the organization has implemented strict laser usage guidelines that recommend or require the use of approved laser-filtering safety eyewear.

On July 8, 2011, the Coast Guard, in association with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, issued a policy implementation and code of regulations designed to provide safety information and guidelines on the use of lasers for all Coast Guard employees. It included a breakdown of laser policy based on the hazard level of each laser classification. Class 1 and Class 2 lasers are not considered to be eye hazards but the classes above that are deemed potential eye threats, as outlined below:

  • Class 3 – Class 3 lasers are broken down into two categories based on hazardous potential. Units with Class 3 lasers shall maintain and account for their current inventory via the property management system.
  • Class 3A/3R – Lasers in this classification may be considered eye safe, but are also likely to be powerful enough to exceed the maximum permissible exposure level for eye damage under normal viewing. They are hazardous if viewed with magnification optics, and require a yellow caution label or red danger label depending on the specifications as defined in reference (a). Operators of this type of laser should ensure everyone in the user area is aware of the hazard, and shall not direct the laser toward anyone potentially using magnification optics.
  • Class 3B – This type of laser is not considered eye safe. It is considered hazardous under most viewing conditions, and could have diffuse reflection capability (ability to reflect/bounce off a smooth surface and not lose any of the hazardous potential, i.e. easily bounce back to operator). All Class 3B lasers require specific engineering control measures as outlined in reference (a) and must contain a red danger label. They must also be inventoried and individually tracked at the unit as well as specifically approved in accordance with this Instruction prior to use.
  • Class 4 – This is the most hazardous type of laser. It is not eye safe under any viewing conditions, and most have a diffuse reflection hazard. This type of laser requires significant control measure to include engineering systems, personal protective equipment (PPE), and detailed approved policy guidance/procedures regarding use. In addition to maintaining a current inventory via the property management system, units that use Class 4 lasers will also be required to designate a Laser Hazard Safety Officer (LHSO) for local oversight of the laser safety program.

Shop Laser Strike GlassesLaser safety glasses are designed to filter out and protect based on a laser’s wavelength. Phillips Safety offers several different styles to choose from, all available with any of the three laser wavelength filters you’ll need to protect your eyes against laser strikes out on the water. Our LS-PSPG lens adjust for a green laser and allows 46.9% VLT (Visible Light Transmittance, a measure of how much light penetrates the lens). The LS-PSPBG protects from both green and blue laser beams, with 43.0% VLT. And the LS-PSPBGR defends against green, blue, and red laser strikes, with a VLT of 23.3%. Contact us today to determine which filters and safety glasses are correct for your Coast Guard usage.

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Laser Safety Glasses for Coast Guard

Thanks to news reports of laser pointer attacks on airplane pilots during take-off or landing, most people associate laser eye strikes with the airline industry.

Coast Guard Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses for Coast GuardIn truth, many industries, as well as branches of the government, are at risk from accidental or intentional laser exposure. The U.S. Coast Guard is certainly no exception, and the organization has implemented strict laser usage guidelines that recommend or require the use of approved laser-filtering safety eyewear.

On July 8, 2011, the Coast Guard, in association with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, issued a policy implementation and code of regulations designed to provide safety information and guidelines on the use of lasers for all Coast Guard employees. It included a breakdown of laser policy based on the hazard level of each laser classification. Class 1 and Class 2 lasers are not considered to be eye hazards but the classes above that are deemed potential eye threats, as outlined below:

  • Class 3 – Class 3 lasers are broken down into two categories based on hazardous potential. Units with Class 3 lasers shall maintain and account for their current inventory via the property management system.
  • Class 3A/3R – Lasers in this classification may be considered eye safe, but are also likely to be powerful enough to exceed the maximum permissible exposure level for eye damage under normal viewing. They are hazardous if viewed with magnification optics, and require a yellow caution label or red danger label depending on the specifications as defined in reference (a). Operators of this type of laser should ensure everyone in the user area is aware of the hazard, and shall not direct the laser toward anyone potentially using magnification optics.
  • Class 3B – This type of laser is not considered eye safe. It is considered hazardous under most viewing conditions, and could have diffuse reflection capability (ability to reflect/bounce off a smooth surface and not lose any of the hazardous potential, i.e. easily bounce back to operator). All Class 3B lasers require specific engineering control measures as outlined in reference (a) and must contain a red danger label. They must also be inventoried and individually tracked at the unit as well as specifically approved in accordance with this Instruction prior to use.
  • Class 4 – This is the most hazardous type of laser. It is not eye safe under any viewing conditions, and most have a diffuse reflection hazard. This type of laser requires significant control measure to include engineering systems, personal protective equipment (PPE), and detailed approved policy guidance/procedures regarding use. In addition to maintaining a current inventory via the property management system, units that use Class 4 lasers will also be required to designate a Laser Hazard Safety Officer (LHSO) for local oversight of the laser safety program.

Shop Laser Strike GlassesLaser safety glasses are designed to filter out and protect based on a laser’s wavelength. Phillips Safety offers several different styles to choose from, all available with any of the three laser wavelength filters you’ll need to protect your eyes against laser strikes out on the water. Our LS-PSPG lens adjust for a green laser and allows 46.9% VLT (Visible Light Transmittance, a measure of how much light penetrates the lens). The LS-PSPBG protects from both green and blue laser beams, with 43.0% VLT. And the LS-PSPBGR defends against green, blue, and red laser strikes, with a VLT of 23.3%. Contact us today to determine which filters and safety glasses are correct for your Coast Guard usage.

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Laser Safety Glasses for Coast Guard

Thanks to news reports of laser pointer attacks on airplane pilots during take-off or landing, most people associate laser eye strikes with the airline industry.

Coast Guard Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses for Coast GuardIn truth, many industries, as well as branches of the government, are at risk from accidental or intentional laser exposure. The U.S. Coast Guard is certainly no exception, and the organization has implemented strict laser usage guidelines that recommend or require the use of approved laser-filtering safety eyewear.

On July 8, 2011, the Coast Guard, in association with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, issued a policy implementation and code of regulations designed to provide safety information and guidelines on the use of lasers for all Coast Guard employees. It included a breakdown of laser policy based on the hazard level of each laser classification. Class 1 and Class 2 lasers are not considered to be eye hazards but the classes above that are deemed potential eye threats, as outlined below:

  • Class 3 – Class 3 lasers are broken down into two categories based on hazardous potential. Units with Class 3 lasers shall maintain and account for their current inventory via the property management system.
  • Class 3A/3R – Lasers in this classification may be considered eye safe, but are also likely to be powerful enough to exceed the maximum permissible exposure level for eye damage under normal viewing. They are hazardous if viewed with magnification optics, and require a yellow caution label or red danger label depending on the specifications as defined in reference (a). Operators of this type of laser should ensure everyone in the user area is aware of the hazard, and shall not direct the laser toward anyone potentially using magnification optics.
  • Class 3B – This type of laser is not considered eye safe. It is considered hazardous under most viewing conditions, and could have diffuse reflection capability (ability to reflect/bounce off a smooth surface and not lose any of the hazardous potential, i.e. easily bounce back to operator). All Class 3B lasers require specific engineering control measures as outlined in reference (a) and must contain a red danger label. They must also be inventoried and individually tracked at the unit as well as specifically approved in accordance with this Instruction prior to use.
  • Class 4 – This is the most hazardous type of laser. It is not eye safe under any viewing conditions, and most have a diffuse reflection hazard. This type of laser requires significant control measure to include engineering systems, personal protective equipment (PPE), and detailed approved policy guidance/procedures regarding use. In addition to maintaining a current inventory via the property management system, units that use Class 4 lasers will also be required to designate a Laser Hazard Safety Officer (LHSO) for local oversight of the laser safety program.

Shop Laser Strike GlassesLaser safety glasses are designed to filter out and protect based on a laser’s wavelength. Phillips Safety offers several different styles to choose from, all available with any of the three laser wavelength filters you’ll need to protect your eyes against laser strikes out on the water. Our LS-PSPG lens adjust for a green laser and allows 46.9% VLT (Visible Light Transmittance, a measure of how much light penetrates the lens). The LS-PSPBG protects from both green and blue laser beams, with 43.0% VLT. And the LS-PSPBGR defends against green, blue, and red laser strikes, with a VLT of 23.3%. Contact us today to determine which filters and safety glasses are correct for your Coast Guard usage.

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-safety-glasses-for-coast-guard/trackback/

Laser Safety Glasses for Coast Guard

Thanks to news reports of laser pointer attacks on airplane pilots during take-off or landing, most people associate laser eye strikes with the airline industry.

Coast Guard Laser Safety Glasses

Laser Safety Glasses for Coast GuardIn truth, many industries, as well as branches of the government, are at risk from accidental or intentional laser exposure. The U.S. Coast Guard is certainly no exception, and the organization has implemented strict laser usage guidelines that recommend or require the use of approved laser-filtering safety eyewear.

On July 8, 2011, the Coast Guard, in association with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, issued a policy implementation and code of regulations designed to provide safety information and guidelines on the use of lasers for all Coast Guard employees. It included a breakdown of laser policy based on the hazard level of each laser classification. Class 1 and Class 2 lasers are not considered to be eye hazards but the classes above that are deemed potential eye threats, as outlined below:

  • Class 3 – Class 3 lasers are broken down into two categories based on hazardous potential. Units with Class 3 lasers shall maintain and account for their current inventory via the property management system.
  • Class 3A/3R – Lasers in this classification may be considered eye safe, but are also likely to be powerful enough to exceed the maximum permissible exposure level for eye damage under normal viewing. They are hazardous if viewed with magnification optics, and require a yellow caution label or red danger label depending on the specifications as defined in reference (a). Operators of this type of laser should ensure everyone in the user area is aware of the hazard, and shall not direct the laser toward anyone potentially using magnification optics.
  • Class 3B – This type of laser is not considered eye safe. It is considered hazardous under most viewing conditions, and could have diffuse reflection capability (ability to reflect/bounce off a smooth surface and not lose any of the hazardous potential, i.e. easily bounce back to operator). All Class 3B lasers require specific engineering control measures as outlined in reference (a) and must contain a red danger label. They must also be inventoried and individually tracked at the unit as well as specifically approved in accordance with this Instruction prior to use.
  • Class 4 – This is the most hazardous type of laser. It is not eye safe under any viewing conditions, and most have a diffuse reflection hazard. This type of laser requires significant control measure to include engineering systems, personal protective equipment (PPE), and detailed approved policy guidance/procedures regarding use. In addition to maintaining a current inventory via the property management system, units that use Class 4 lasers will also be required to designate a Laser Hazard Safety Officer (LHSO) for local oversight of the laser safety program.

Shop Laser Strike GlassesLaser safety glasses are designed to filter out and protect based on a laser’s wavelength. Phillips Safety offers several different styles to choose from, all available with any of the three laser wavelength filters you’ll need to protect your eyes against laser strikes out on the water. Our LS-PSPG lens adjust for a green laser and allows 46.9% VLT (Visible Light Transmittance, a measure of how much light penetrates the lens). The LS-PSPBG protects from both green and blue laser beams, with 43.0% VLT. And the LS-PSPBGR defends against green, blue, and red laser strikes, with a VLT of 23.3%. Contact us today to determine which filters and safety glasses are correct for your Coast Guard usage.

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-safety-glasses-for-coast-guard/trackback/