Laser Protection Glasses Aviation

With the multitude of safety concerns related to the airline industry, it may seem likely that laser pointers strikes are at the bottom of the list.

Aviation Laser Protection Glasses

Laser Protection Glasses AviationBut the problem of people on the ground pointing lasers at aircraft is neither a limited nor a trivial problem.

“Shining a laser into the cockpit of an aircraft can temporarily blind a pilot, jeopardizing the safety of everyone on board,” reported FAA Administrator Michael Huerta in a February 11, 2014 FBI report. “We applaud our colleagues at the Justice Department for aggressively prosecuting aircraft laser incidents, and we will continue to use civil penalties to further deter this dangerous activity.”

The statistics on laser eye strikes directed at aircraft are alarming:

  • A total of 3,960 laser strikes reported were reported in 2013—an average of almost 11 incidents per day.
  • Between 2005 (the first year the FBI and FAA began recording pilot-reported laser eye strikes or attempted strikes) and 2014, incidents have increased at a rate greater than 1,100%.
  • These statistics are based only on reported incidents – and investigators estimate that every year thousands of incidents go unreported.
  • The problem has become so prevalent that the FBI has initiated a new program to deter people from pointing lasers at aircraft.
  • The FBI offers a reward of up to $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest of any individual who aims a laser at an aircraft.
  • The FBI is also coordinating with state and local law enforcement to educate teens about the dangers associated with lasing.

“Aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft is a serious matter and a violation of federal law,” added Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. “It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions.”

Shop Laser Strike EyewearTo combat this growing problem, Phillips Safety Products carries laser strike eyewear that filters out harmful and distracting laser light. Ten different frame styles are available in various colors. These frames can be ordered with one of three different lens filters: the LS-PSPG, which allows for 46.9% VLT (Visual Light Transmittance, or the percentage of visible light that passes through the lens) and protects from the most commonly-used laser pointers, those with a green beam; the LS-PSPBG, that protects from both green and blue laser beams with a 43.0% VLT; and the LS-PSPBGR, with a 46.9% VLT and lenses that filter out blue, green, and red beams.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-protection-glasses-aviation/trackback/

Laser Protection Glasses Aviation

With the multitude of safety concerns related to the airline industry, it may seem likely that laser pointers strikes are at the bottom of the list.

Aviation Laser Protection Glasses

Laser Protection Glasses AviationBut the problem of people on the ground pointing lasers at aircraft is neither a limited nor a trivial problem.

“Shining a laser into the cockpit of an aircraft can temporarily blind a pilot, jeopardizing the safety of everyone on board,” reported FAA Administrator Michael Huerta in a February 11, 2014 FBI report. “We applaud our colleagues at the Justice Department for aggressively prosecuting aircraft laser incidents, and we will continue to use civil penalties to further deter this dangerous activity.”

The statistics on laser eye strikes directed at aircraft are alarming:

  • A total of 3,960 laser strikes reported were reported in 2013—an average of almost 11 incidents per day.
  • Between 2005 (the first year the FBI and FAA began recording pilot-reported laser eye strikes or attempted strikes) and 2014, incidents have increased at a rate greater than 1,100%.
  • These statistics are based only on reported incidents – and investigators estimate that every year thousands of incidents go unreported.
  • The problem has become so prevalent that the FBI has initiated a new program to deter people from pointing lasers at aircraft.
  • The FBI offers a reward of up to $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest of any individual who aims a laser at an aircraft.
  • The FBI is also coordinating with state and local law enforcement to educate teens about the dangers associated with lasing.

“Aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft is a serious matter and a violation of federal law,” added Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. “It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions.”

Shop Laser Strike EyewearTo combat this growing problem, Phillips Safety Products carries laser strike eyewear that filters out harmful and distracting laser light. Ten different frame styles are available in various colors. These frames can be ordered with one of three different lens filters: the LS-PSPG, which allows for 46.9% VLT (Visual Light Transmittance, or the percentage of visible light that passes through the lens) and protects from the most commonly-used laser pointers, those with a green beam; the LS-PSPBG, that protects from both green and blue laser beams with a 43.0% VLT; and the LS-PSPBGR, with a 46.9% VLT and lenses that filter out blue, green, and red beams.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-protection-glasses-aviation/trackback/

Laser Protection Glasses Aviation

With the multitude of safety concerns related to the airline industry, it may seem likely that laser pointers strikes are at the bottom of the list.

Aviation Laser Protection Glasses

Laser Protection Glasses AviationBut the problem of people on the ground pointing lasers at aircraft is neither a limited nor a trivial problem.

“Shining a laser into the cockpit of an aircraft can temporarily blind a pilot, jeopardizing the safety of everyone on board,” reported FAA Administrator Michael Huerta in a February 11, 2014 FBI report. “We applaud our colleagues at the Justice Department for aggressively prosecuting aircraft laser incidents, and we will continue to use civil penalties to further deter this dangerous activity.”

The statistics on laser eye strikes directed at aircraft are alarming:

  • A total of 3,960 laser strikes reported were reported in 2013—an average of almost 11 incidents per day.
  • Between 2005 (the first year the FBI and FAA began recording pilot-reported laser eye strikes or attempted strikes) and 2014, incidents have increased at a rate greater than 1,100%.
  • These statistics are based only on reported incidents – and investigators estimate that every year thousands of incidents go unreported.
  • The problem has become so prevalent that the FBI has initiated a new program to deter people from pointing lasers at aircraft.
  • The FBI offers a reward of up to $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest of any individual who aims a laser at an aircraft.
  • The FBI is also coordinating with state and local law enforcement to educate teens about the dangers associated with lasing.

“Aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft is a serious matter and a violation of federal law,” added Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. “It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions.”

Shop Laser Strike EyewearTo combat this growing problem, Phillips Safety Products carries laser strike eyewear that filters out harmful and distracting laser light. Ten different frame styles are available in various colors. These frames can be ordered with one of three different lens filters: the LS-PSPG, which allows for 46.9% VLT (Visual Light Transmittance, or the percentage of visible light that passes through the lens) and protects from the most commonly-used laser pointers, those with a green beam; the LS-PSPBG, that protects from both green and blue laser beams with a 43.0% VLT; and the LS-PSPBGR, with a 46.9% VLT and lenses that filter out blue, green, and red beams.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-protection-glasses-aviation/trackback/

Laser Protection Glasses Aviation

With the multitude of safety concerns related to the airline industry, it may seem likely that laser pointers strikes are at the bottom of the list.

Aviation Laser Protection Glasses

Laser Protection Glasses AviationBut the problem of people on the ground pointing lasers at aircraft is neither a limited nor a trivial problem.

“Shining a laser into the cockpit of an aircraft can temporarily blind a pilot, jeopardizing the safety of everyone on board,” reported FAA Administrator Michael Huerta in a February 11, 2014 FBI report. “We applaud our colleagues at the Justice Department for aggressively prosecuting aircraft laser incidents, and we will continue to use civil penalties to further deter this dangerous activity.”

The statistics on laser eye strikes directed at aircraft are alarming:

  • A total of 3,960 laser strikes reported were reported in 2013—an average of almost 11 incidents per day.
  • Between 2005 (the first year the FBI and FAA began recording pilot-reported laser eye strikes or attempted strikes) and 2014, incidents have increased at a rate greater than 1,100%.
  • These statistics are based only on reported incidents – and investigators estimate that every year thousands of incidents go unreported.
  • The problem has become so prevalent that the FBI has initiated a new program to deter people from pointing lasers at aircraft.
  • The FBI offers a reward of up to $10,000 for information that leads to the arrest of any individual who aims a laser at an aircraft.
  • The FBI is also coordinating with state and local law enforcement to educate teens about the dangers associated with lasing.

“Aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft is a serious matter and a violation of federal law,” added Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. “It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions.”

Shop Laser Strike EyewearTo combat this growing problem, Phillips Safety Products carries laser strike eyewear that filters out harmful and distracting laser light. Ten different frame styles are available in various colors. These frames can be ordered with one of three different lens filters: the LS-PSPG, which allows for 46.9% VLT (Visual Light Transmittance, or the percentage of visible light that passes through the lens) and protects from the most commonly-used laser pointers, those with a green beam; the LS-PSPBG, that protects from both green and blue laser beams with a 43.0% VLT; and the LS-PSPBGR, with a 46.9% VLT and lenses that filter out blue, green, and red beams.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/laser-protection-glasses-aviation/trackback/