How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?

Optical density is related to the filtering of light, and visible light transmission is how much light gets to your eyes. So how do the two relate?

The Relationship of Optical Density to Visible Light Transmission

OD Vs. VLTVisible light transmission, or VLT, is the amount of visible light that passes through a lens to get to your eye. The higher the VLT in your Laser Safety Goggles, the more visible light gets to your eye, and the better you can see. The lower VLT is, the darker your lenses will be, which can be cumbersome and inconvenient.

Optical density, or OD, is inversely related to the amount of light that passes through a lens at a specific wavelength. Since the visible light spectrum (abour 400-700nm wavelengths of light) is only a small fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum (lasers operate as low as 100nm and as high as 11,000nm), optical density only relates to VLT where it deals with visible wavelengths of light. In other words, you could have a very high OD for a laser filter, but if it’s blocking an invisible beam, you could still have clear laser safety goggles.

Here’s how optical density and visible light transmission relate:

  • The higher your OD is at a specific wavelength, the more the lens blocks that wavelength of light. 
  • The higher your VLT is, the clearer your lenses are, and the easier they are to work in.
  • Any blockage that occurs in the visible light spectrum (about 400-700nm) is going to decrease your VLT. The higher the OD here, the darker your lenses are.
  • Conversely, blockage outside the visible light spectrum does not directly impact the darkness of your lenses.
  • Higher VLT is always optimal, but if your laser operates in the visible spectrum, you need to have proper protection, which will color or darken your lenses.
  • Glass laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and safer.

There is no substitute for proper protection. If you need to have a high OD rating in the visible spectrum, you are going to have to deal with lenses that block at least some of your visible light. It is always a good idea to optimize your VLT as much as possible without sacrificing safety in OD ratings.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

There are many styles of laser safety goggles that offer lots of protection, have very high VLT, and appear completely or almost completely clear. These are protecting against invisible lasers. If you have a laser that operates outside the visible spectrum, count yourself lucky: you don’t have to work wearing dark safety goggles.

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles, optical density, or VLT, leave them in the comments! We’d love to hear from you. Thanks so much for reading, and stay safe!

One Response to How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?
  1. [...] is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the [...]

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/how-does-optical-density-relate-to-visible-light-transmission/trackback/

How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?

Optical density is related to the filtering of light, and visible light transmission is how much light gets to your eyes. So how do the two relate?

The Relationship of Optical Density to Visible Light Transmission

OD Vs. VLTVisible light transmission, or VLT, is the amount of visible light that passes through a lens to get to your eye. The higher the VLT in your Laser Safety Goggles, the more visible light gets to your eye, and the better you can see. The lower VLT is, the darker your lenses will be, which can be cumbersome and inconvenient.

Optical density, or OD, is inversely related to the amount of light that passes through a lens at a specific wavelength. Since the visible light spectrum (abour 400-700nm wavelengths of light) is only a small fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum (lasers operate as low as 100nm and as high as 11,000nm), optical density only relates to VLT where it deals with visible wavelengths of light. In other words, you could have a very high OD for a laser filter, but if it’s blocking an invisible beam, you could still have clear laser safety goggles.

Here’s how optical density and visible light transmission relate:

  • The higher your OD is at a specific wavelength, the more the lens blocks that wavelength of light. 
  • The higher your VLT is, the clearer your lenses are, and the easier they are to work in.
  • Any blockage that occurs in the visible light spectrum (about 400-700nm) is going to decrease your VLT. The higher the OD here, the darker your lenses are.
  • Conversely, blockage outside the visible light spectrum does not directly impact the darkness of your lenses.
  • Higher VLT is always optimal, but if your laser operates in the visible spectrum, you need to have proper protection, which will color or darken your lenses.
  • Glass laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and safer.

There is no substitute for proper protection. If you need to have a high OD rating in the visible spectrum, you are going to have to deal with lenses that block at least some of your visible light. It is always a good idea to optimize your VLT as much as possible without sacrificing safety in OD ratings.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

There are many styles of laser safety goggles that offer lots of protection, have very high VLT, and appear completely or almost completely clear. These are protecting against invisible lasers. If you have a laser that operates outside the visible spectrum, count yourself lucky: you don’t have to work wearing dark safety goggles.

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles, optical density, or VLT, leave them in the comments! We’d love to hear from you. Thanks so much for reading, and stay safe!

One Response to How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?
  1. [...] is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/how-does-optical-density-relate-to-visible-light-transmission/trackback/

How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?

Optical density is related to the filtering of light, and visible light transmission is how much light gets to your eyes. So how do the two relate?

The Relationship of Optical Density to Visible Light Transmission

OD Vs. VLTVisible light transmission, or VLT, is the amount of visible light that passes through a lens to get to your eye. The higher the VLT in your Laser Safety Goggles, the more visible light gets to your eye, and the better you can see. The lower VLT is, the darker your lenses will be, which can be cumbersome and inconvenient.

Optical density, or OD, is inversely related to the amount of light that passes through a lens at a specific wavelength. Since the visible light spectrum (abour 400-700nm wavelengths of light) is only a small fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum (lasers operate as low as 100nm and as high as 11,000nm), optical density only relates to VLT where it deals with visible wavelengths of light. In other words, you could have a very high OD for a laser filter, but if it’s blocking an invisible beam, you could still have clear laser safety goggles.

Here’s how optical density and visible light transmission relate:

  • The higher your OD is at a specific wavelength, the more the lens blocks that wavelength of light. 
  • The higher your VLT is, the clearer your lenses are, and the easier they are to work in.
  • Any blockage that occurs in the visible light spectrum (about 400-700nm) is going to decrease your VLT. The higher the OD here, the darker your lenses are.
  • Conversely, blockage outside the visible light spectrum does not directly impact the darkness of your lenses.
  • Higher VLT is always optimal, but if your laser operates in the visible spectrum, you need to have proper protection, which will color or darken your lenses.
  • Glass laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and safer.

There is no substitute for proper protection. If you need to have a high OD rating in the visible spectrum, you are going to have to deal with lenses that block at least some of your visible light. It is always a good idea to optimize your VLT as much as possible without sacrificing safety in OD ratings.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

There are many styles of laser safety goggles that offer lots of protection, have very high VLT, and appear completely or almost completely clear. These are protecting against invisible lasers. If you have a laser that operates outside the visible spectrum, count yourself lucky: you don’t have to work wearing dark safety goggles.

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles, optical density, or VLT, leave them in the comments! We’d love to hear from you. Thanks so much for reading, and stay safe!

One Response to How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?
  1. [...] is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the [...]

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/how-does-optical-density-relate-to-visible-light-transmission/trackback/

How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?

Optical density is related to the filtering of light, and visible light transmission is how much light gets to your eyes. So how do the two relate?

The Relationship of Optical Density to Visible Light Transmission

OD Vs. VLTVisible light transmission, or VLT, is the amount of visible light that passes through a lens to get to your eye. The higher the VLT in your Laser Safety Goggles, the more visible light gets to your eye, and the better you can see. The lower VLT is, the darker your lenses will be, which can be cumbersome and inconvenient.

Optical density, or OD, is inversely related to the amount of light that passes through a lens at a specific wavelength. Since the visible light spectrum (abour 400-700nm wavelengths of light) is only a small fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum (lasers operate as low as 100nm and as high as 11,000nm), optical density only relates to VLT where it deals with visible wavelengths of light. In other words, you could have a very high OD for a laser filter, but if it’s blocking an invisible beam, you could still have clear laser safety goggles.

Here’s how optical density and visible light transmission relate:

  • The higher your OD is at a specific wavelength, the more the lens blocks that wavelength of light. 
  • The higher your VLT is, the clearer your lenses are, and the easier they are to work in.
  • Any blockage that occurs in the visible light spectrum (about 400-700nm) is going to decrease your VLT. The higher the OD here, the darker your lenses are.
  • Conversely, blockage outside the visible light spectrum does not directly impact the darkness of your lenses.
  • Higher VLT is always optimal, but if your laser operates in the visible spectrum, you need to have proper protection, which will color or darken your lenses.
  • Glass laser filters tend to have higher VLT and better protection, meaning your goggles will be clearer and safer.

There is no substitute for proper protection. If you need to have a high OD rating in the visible spectrum, you are going to have to deal with lenses that block at least some of your visible light. It is always a good idea to optimize your VLT as much as possible without sacrificing safety in OD ratings.

Shop Laser Safety Goggles

There are many styles of laser safety goggles that offer lots of protection, have very high VLT, and appear completely or almost completely clear. These are protecting against invisible lasers. If you have a laser that operates outside the visible spectrum, count yourself lucky: you don’t have to work wearing dark safety goggles.

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles, optical density, or VLT, leave them in the comments! We’d love to hear from you. Thanks so much for reading, and stay safe!

One Response to How Does Optical Density Relate to Visible Light Transmission?
  1. [...] is, if you need to see well while the laser is in use, you should go with a  lens that has high VLT. This will likely be glass and more expensive. If you only need to set up the laser, then wear the [...]

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Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/how-does-optical-density-relate-to-visible-light-transmission/trackback/