How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

The biological makeup of the eye is the reason eye safety around lasers is a major concern.

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?In most other parts of the body, pain receptors act as sentries to relate emergency information to the brain. If, for example, you accidentally touch your arm to a hot stove, localized pain receptors alert your brain in milliseconds, causing you to pull your arm away and minimize the burn damage. There are, however, no pain receptors in the retina, so when radiation in the form of light enters in concentrated levels, such as the focused beam of a laser, damage occurs without warning. The brain is not alerted to the problem so it does not send a signal to blink or turn away from the damaging light source.

This is why laser safety glasses are so important if you use a certain class of laser, or are in the vicinity of a laser in use. But how exactly do they work? How do laser safety glasses allow for clear vision but still block the harmful concentrated light of a laser?

To understand that one needs to be aware of two properties of a laser: light wavelength and optical density.

Light travels in waves, and the wavelength is the spatial period of the wave – the distance between which the highs and lows repeat. In other words, all types of light feature a distinctive, repeating wave, which rises and falls in a specific pattern; wavelength is the measurement of the repeating highs or lows of this wave pattern. Wavelength is typically measured in nanometers (nm), and grouped into ranges that categorize the properties of light in each wavelength range.

Optical density is a term that identifies how much incoming light is absorbed by a lens. The optical density of lens is used to measure the transmittance of light in a given wavelength.

Laser safety glasses typically filter out distinctive wavelength ranges – the key is to match your safety lenses to the wavelength of your laser, and determine the optical density of the lens to be sure adequate eye protection is present. For example, there’s one type of filter that covers three wavelength ranges, each at a specific optical density:

  • 900-1000nm with an optical density of 5+
  • 1000-2400nm with an optical density of 7+
  • 2900-10600nm with an optical density of 7+

For laser safety glasses to properly filter out the harmful rays of a particular laser, one must know the laser’s wavelength and the optical density of the lenses. Once armed with these two specifications, you can determine the exact type of safety lens that should be used in a given situation.

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf you have any trouble locating your laser’s operating wavelength or have questions about the proper laser safety lens for your particular application, call or email us at Phillips Safety Products. We have laser specialists to guide you, calculate optical density, and answer all of your questions. Our laser consultations are always free of charge.

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How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

The biological makeup of the eye is the reason eye safety around lasers is a major concern.

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?In most other parts of the body, pain receptors act as sentries to relate emergency information to the brain. If, for example, you accidentally touch your arm to a hot stove, localized pain receptors alert your brain in milliseconds, causing you to pull your arm away and minimize the burn damage. There are, however, no pain receptors in the retina, so when radiation in the form of light enters in concentrated levels, such as the focused beam of a laser, damage occurs without warning. The brain is not alerted to the problem so it does not send a signal to blink or turn away from the damaging light source.

This is why laser safety glasses are so important if you use a certain class of laser, or are in the vicinity of a laser in use. But how exactly do they work? How do laser safety glasses allow for clear vision but still block the harmful concentrated light of a laser?

To understand that one needs to be aware of two properties of a laser: light wavelength and optical density.

Light travels in waves, and the wavelength is the spatial period of the wave – the distance between which the highs and lows repeat. In other words, all types of light feature a distinctive, repeating wave, which rises and falls in a specific pattern; wavelength is the measurement of the repeating highs or lows of this wave pattern. Wavelength is typically measured in nanometers (nm), and grouped into ranges that categorize the properties of light in each wavelength range.

Optical density is a term that identifies how much incoming light is absorbed by a lens. The optical density of lens is used to measure the transmittance of light in a given wavelength.

Laser safety glasses typically filter out distinctive wavelength ranges – the key is to match your safety lenses to the wavelength of your laser, and determine the optical density of the lens to be sure adequate eye protection is present. For example, there’s one type of filter that covers three wavelength ranges, each at a specific optical density:

  • 900-1000nm with an optical density of 5+
  • 1000-2400nm with an optical density of 7+
  • 2900-10600nm with an optical density of 7+

For laser safety glasses to properly filter out the harmful rays of a particular laser, one must know the laser’s wavelength and the optical density of the lenses. Once armed with these two specifications, you can determine the exact type of safety lens that should be used in a given situation.

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf you have any trouble locating your laser’s operating wavelength or have questions about the proper laser safety lens for your particular application, call or email us at Phillips Safety Products. We have laser specialists to guide you, calculate optical density, and answer all of your questions. Our laser consultations are always free of charge.

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How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

The biological makeup of the eye is the reason eye safety around lasers is a major concern.

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?In most other parts of the body, pain receptors act as sentries to relate emergency information to the brain. If, for example, you accidentally touch your arm to a hot stove, localized pain receptors alert your brain in milliseconds, causing you to pull your arm away and minimize the burn damage. There are, however, no pain receptors in the retina, so when radiation in the form of light enters in concentrated levels, such as the focused beam of a laser, damage occurs without warning. The brain is not alerted to the problem so it does not send a signal to blink or turn away from the damaging light source.

This is why laser safety glasses are so important if you use a certain class of laser, or are in the vicinity of a laser in use. But how exactly do they work? How do laser safety glasses allow for clear vision but still block the harmful concentrated light of a laser?

To understand that one needs to be aware of two properties of a laser: light wavelength and optical density.

Light travels in waves, and the wavelength is the spatial period of the wave – the distance between which the highs and lows repeat. In other words, all types of light feature a distinctive, repeating wave, which rises and falls in a specific pattern; wavelength is the measurement of the repeating highs or lows of this wave pattern. Wavelength is typically measured in nanometers (nm), and grouped into ranges that categorize the properties of light in each wavelength range.

Optical density is a term that identifies how much incoming light is absorbed by a lens. The optical density of lens is used to measure the transmittance of light in a given wavelength.

Laser safety glasses typically filter out distinctive wavelength ranges – the key is to match your safety lenses to the wavelength of your laser, and determine the optical density of the lens to be sure adequate eye protection is present. For example, there’s one type of filter that covers three wavelength ranges, each at a specific optical density:

  • 900-1000nm with an optical density of 5+
  • 1000-2400nm with an optical density of 7+
  • 2900-10600nm with an optical density of 7+

For laser safety glasses to properly filter out the harmful rays of a particular laser, one must know the laser’s wavelength and the optical density of the lenses. Once armed with these two specifications, you can determine the exact type of safety lens that should be used in a given situation.

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf you have any trouble locating your laser’s operating wavelength or have questions about the proper laser safety lens for your particular application, call or email us at Phillips Safety Products. We have laser specialists to guide you, calculate optical density, and answer all of your questions. Our laser consultations are always free of charge.

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/how-do-laser-safety-glasses-work/trackback/

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

The biological makeup of the eye is the reason eye safety around lasers is a major concern.

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?

How Do Laser Safety Glasses Work?In most other parts of the body, pain receptors act as sentries to relate emergency information to the brain. If, for example, you accidentally touch your arm to a hot stove, localized pain receptors alert your brain in milliseconds, causing you to pull your arm away and minimize the burn damage. There are, however, no pain receptors in the retina, so when radiation in the form of light enters in concentrated levels, such as the focused beam of a laser, damage occurs without warning. The brain is not alerted to the problem so it does not send a signal to blink or turn away from the damaging light source.

This is why laser safety glasses are so important if you use a certain class of laser, or are in the vicinity of a laser in use. But how exactly do they work? How do laser safety glasses allow for clear vision but still block the harmful concentrated light of a laser?

To understand that one needs to be aware of two properties of a laser: light wavelength and optical density.

Light travels in waves, and the wavelength is the spatial period of the wave – the distance between which the highs and lows repeat. In other words, all types of light feature a distinctive, repeating wave, which rises and falls in a specific pattern; wavelength is the measurement of the repeating highs or lows of this wave pattern. Wavelength is typically measured in nanometers (nm), and grouped into ranges that categorize the properties of light in each wavelength range.

Optical density is a term that identifies how much incoming light is absorbed by a lens. The optical density of lens is used to measure the transmittance of light in a given wavelength.

Laser safety glasses typically filter out distinctive wavelength ranges – the key is to match your safety lenses to the wavelength of your laser, and determine the optical density of the lens to be sure adequate eye protection is present. For example, there’s one type of filter that covers three wavelength ranges, each at a specific optical density:

  • 900-1000nm with an optical density of 5+
  • 1000-2400nm with an optical density of 7+
  • 2900-10600nm with an optical density of 7+

For laser safety glasses to properly filter out the harmful rays of a particular laser, one must know the laser’s wavelength and the optical density of the lenses. Once armed with these two specifications, you can determine the exact type of safety lens that should be used in a given situation.

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf you have any trouble locating your laser’s operating wavelength or have questions about the proper laser safety lens for your particular application, call or email us at Phillips Safety Products. We have laser specialists to guide you, calculate optical density, and answer all of your questions. Our laser consultations are always free of charge.

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