Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Wondering what your eyewear needs to be acceptable as laser safety goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?Yes!
… well, most of the time.

In general, according to the American National Standards Institute, or ANSI, optical density (OD) and wavelength need to be posted on goggles for them to be acceptable for use. As with all things in life, however, there are some exceptions to this rule.

The most notable exception to this rule is IPL glasses. IPL, or Intense Pulse Lasers, use light that is not usually focused at a specific wavelength, but rather ranges across many wavelengths. The effect of IPL lasers comes not from a typical type of focused, narrow-wavelength beam like most lasers; rather, it comes from an intense pulse of bright light. The light, rather than being hyper focused, is instead very bright. For these glasses, OD and wavelength do not need to be posted on the goggles because they’re not protecting against specific wavelengths. IPL goggles just cut down on the brightness of the light, much like a pair of sunglasses.

For the vast majority of laser safety glasses, though, there is a simple answer to the question, “Does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles?” – Yes!

  • The ANSI standard for laser safety goggles in the United States requires the wavelengths and optical densities to be posted on all removable parts of laser goggles (frame front, left arm and right arm) for them to be acceptable for use with a laser.
  • If you are caught by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, without appropriate laser safety goggles, you can be fined or reprimanded.
  • Even if your glasses are appropriate for your laser, if the printing has come off and your OD and wavelength are no longer legible, they are no longer up to the ANSI standard and are not OSHA-approved.
  • Most IPL laser safety goggles do not need OD and wavelength posted on the goggles.
  • So, does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles? Yes, unless they’re for IPL.

If you aren’t sure if you have the right glasses for your laser, the OD and wavelength probably aren’t posted on them, which means that they’re probably not right for your laser!

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf your laser safety goggles are ever in question, if you’re ever not sure whether they’re right for your laser, or if you’re ever unsure of whether you’re protected from hazards in your work environment, stop working and find out if you’re safe. Don’t ever allow yourself to be put in a situation where your vision is possibly in jeopardy, and always speak up if you’re uncomfortable or feeling unsafe at work. It’s not worth potentially permanent bodily injury to stay quiet. Be proactive about your safety!

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles or what’s right for you, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below or visit our other posts. You can also look up further information about American laser standards in the ANSI Z136 standard. Thanks for reading, and stay safe!

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Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Wondering what your eyewear needs to be acceptable as laser safety goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?Yes!
… well, most of the time.

In general, according to the American National Standards Institute, or ANSI, optical density (OD) and wavelength need to be posted on goggles for them to be acceptable for use. As with all things in life, however, there are some exceptions to this rule.

The most notable exception to this rule is IPL glasses. IPL, or Intense Pulse Lasers, use light that is not usually focused at a specific wavelength, but rather ranges across many wavelengths. The effect of IPL lasers comes not from a typical type of focused, narrow-wavelength beam like most lasers; rather, it comes from an intense pulse of bright light. The light, rather than being hyper focused, is instead very bright. For these glasses, OD and wavelength do not need to be posted on the goggles because they’re not protecting against specific wavelengths. IPL goggles just cut down on the brightness of the light, much like a pair of sunglasses.

For the vast majority of laser safety glasses, though, there is a simple answer to the question, “Does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles?” – Yes!

  • The ANSI standard for laser safety goggles in the United States requires the wavelengths and optical densities to be posted on all removable parts of laser goggles (frame front, left arm and right arm) for them to be acceptable for use with a laser.
  • If you are caught by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, without appropriate laser safety goggles, you can be fined or reprimanded.
  • Even if your glasses are appropriate for your laser, if the printing has come off and your OD and wavelength are no longer legible, they are no longer up to the ANSI standard and are not OSHA-approved.
  • Most IPL laser safety goggles do not need OD and wavelength posted on the goggles.
  • So, does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles? Yes, unless they’re for IPL.

If you aren’t sure if you have the right glasses for your laser, the OD and wavelength probably aren’t posted on them, which means that they’re probably not right for your laser!

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf your laser safety goggles are ever in question, if you’re ever not sure whether they’re right for your laser, or if you’re ever unsure of whether you’re protected from hazards in your work environment, stop working and find out if you’re safe. Don’t ever allow yourself to be put in a situation where your vision is possibly in jeopardy, and always speak up if you’re uncomfortable or feeling unsafe at work. It’s not worth potentially permanent bodily injury to stay quiet. Be proactive about your safety!

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles or what’s right for you, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below or visit our other posts. You can also look up further information about American laser standards in the ANSI Z136 standard. Thanks for reading, and stay safe!

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/does-od-and-wavelength-need-to-be-posted-on-goggles/trackback/

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Wondering what your eyewear needs to be acceptable as laser safety goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?Yes!
… well, most of the time.

In general, according to the American National Standards Institute, or ANSI, optical density (OD) and wavelength need to be posted on goggles for them to be acceptable for use. As with all things in life, however, there are some exceptions to this rule.

The most notable exception to this rule is IPL glasses. IPL, or Intense Pulse Lasers, use light that is not usually focused at a specific wavelength, but rather ranges across many wavelengths. The effect of IPL lasers comes not from a typical type of focused, narrow-wavelength beam like most lasers; rather, it comes from an intense pulse of bright light. The light, rather than being hyper focused, is instead very bright. For these glasses, OD and wavelength do not need to be posted on the goggles because they’re not protecting against specific wavelengths. IPL goggles just cut down on the brightness of the light, much like a pair of sunglasses.

For the vast majority of laser safety glasses, though, there is a simple answer to the question, “Does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles?” – Yes!

  • The ANSI standard for laser safety goggles in the United States requires the wavelengths and optical densities to be posted on all removable parts of laser goggles (frame front, left arm and right arm) for them to be acceptable for use with a laser.
  • If you are caught by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, without appropriate laser safety goggles, you can be fined or reprimanded.
  • Even if your glasses are appropriate for your laser, if the printing has come off and your OD and wavelength are no longer legible, they are no longer up to the ANSI standard and are not OSHA-approved.
  • Most IPL laser safety goggles do not need OD and wavelength posted on the goggles.
  • So, does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles? Yes, unless they’re for IPL.

If you aren’t sure if you have the right glasses for your laser, the OD and wavelength probably aren’t posted on them, which means that they’re probably not right for your laser!

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf your laser safety goggles are ever in question, if you’re ever not sure whether they’re right for your laser, or if you’re ever unsure of whether you’re protected from hazards in your work environment, stop working and find out if you’re safe. Don’t ever allow yourself to be put in a situation where your vision is possibly in jeopardy, and always speak up if you’re uncomfortable or feeling unsafe at work. It’s not worth potentially permanent bodily injury to stay quiet. Be proactive about your safety!

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles or what’s right for you, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below or visit our other posts. You can also look up further information about American laser standards in the ANSI Z136 standard. Thanks for reading, and stay safe!

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/does-od-and-wavelength-need-to-be-posted-on-goggles/trackback/

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Wondering what your eyewear needs to be acceptable as laser safety goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?

Does OD and Wavelength Need to be Posted on Goggles?Yes!
… well, most of the time.

In general, according to the American National Standards Institute, or ANSI, optical density (OD) and wavelength need to be posted on goggles for them to be acceptable for use. As with all things in life, however, there are some exceptions to this rule.

The most notable exception to this rule is IPL glasses. IPL, or Intense Pulse Lasers, use light that is not usually focused at a specific wavelength, but rather ranges across many wavelengths. The effect of IPL lasers comes not from a typical type of focused, narrow-wavelength beam like most lasers; rather, it comes from an intense pulse of bright light. The light, rather than being hyper focused, is instead very bright. For these glasses, OD and wavelength do not need to be posted on the goggles because they’re not protecting against specific wavelengths. IPL goggles just cut down on the brightness of the light, much like a pair of sunglasses.

For the vast majority of laser safety glasses, though, there is a simple answer to the question, “Does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles?” – Yes!

  • The ANSI standard for laser safety goggles in the United States requires the wavelengths and optical densities to be posted on all removable parts of laser goggles (frame front, left arm and right arm) for them to be acceptable for use with a laser.
  • If you are caught by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, without appropriate laser safety goggles, you can be fined or reprimanded.
  • Even if your glasses are appropriate for your laser, if the printing has come off and your OD and wavelength are no longer legible, they are no longer up to the ANSI standard and are not OSHA-approved.
  • Most IPL laser safety goggles do not need OD and wavelength posted on the goggles.
  • So, does OD and wavelength need to be posted on goggles? Yes, unless they’re for IPL.

If you aren’t sure if you have the right glasses for your laser, the OD and wavelength probably aren’t posted on them, which means that they’re probably not right for your laser!

Shop Laser Safety GlassesIf your laser safety goggles are ever in question, if you’re ever not sure whether they’re right for your laser, or if you’re ever unsure of whether you’re protected from hazards in your work environment, stop working and find out if you’re safe. Don’t ever allow yourself to be put in a situation where your vision is possibly in jeopardy, and always speak up if you’re uncomfortable or feeling unsafe at work. It’s not worth potentially permanent bodily injury to stay quiet. Be proactive about your safety!

If you have any questions about laser safety goggles or what’s right for you, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below or visit our other posts. You can also look up further information about American laser standards in the ANSI Z136 standard. Thanks for reading, and stay safe!

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/does-od-and-wavelength-need-to-be-posted-on-goggles/trackback/