Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Laser safety glasses are an essential component for anyone who works with or in the vicinity of lasers.

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety GlassesThis use of lasers in industry, manufacture, construction, and the medical and dental fields has grown exponentially over the years, and the technicians, assistants, patients, medical personnel, assembly workers, and line workers who risk exposure must have proper eye protection in place.

Certain lasers – some more than others – pose a risk to the eye by emitting light that can burn the retina. Since the retina has no pain receptors, people do not feel this occur, thus they are not inclined to shade their eyes or pull away as the damage occurs. Depending on the type of light being emitted, they may not even be aware of the danger…until it’s too late. Retinal burns can happen over long periods of time or in the briefest of moments – again depending on the strength and wavelength of the laser inflicting the damage.

Symptoms of retinal eye damage include itching, burning eyes, the appearance of double-images, white or dark blotches, partial or complete loss of vision, and other physical and visual effects. In mild cases these effects are temporary as the burns heal. When too much damage is done and the retinal tissue cannot fully heal or it leaves behind scar tissue, the effects can be permanent.

The use of properly-matched laser safety glasses is critical in avoiding eye exposure to the damaging rays of a laser. These glasses work by filtering out the exact light wavelength or wavelengths of a particular laser and absorbing the light rays that, unfiltered, would damage the retina. In order to work properly, the glasses must be fitted with filtered lenses that match the optical density, or OD, of the laser in use. So how does one determine the optical density of a given laser?

The answer is a somewhat complicated formula that varies with the pulse mode of the laser. For constant wave lasers, the formula involves the wavelength and the output of power in watts; for single pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, and pulse width; for repetitive pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency.

To calculate the proper OD, the requisite laser statistics must be first be obtained. If you need to figure out optical density for a given laser, you have a few options to explore. Follow the guide below:

  • Consult the Laser’s Label or Manual – All commercially-available lasers should be labeled with the information necessary to determine the OD. It should be permanently mounted on a label or metal plate attached to the laser’s apparatus. If not, the manual or operating instructions should list the statistics.
  • Consult the Laser’s Manufacturer – If the above fails to provide precise information or the label/manual is lost or missing, consult the company that manufactured the laser for the exact statistics.
  • Use the Info to Calculate OD – several online sites offer free OD calculators in which you can input your laser’s vital statistics and have the calculation done for you.
  • Contact Phillips Safety – if unsure of how to proceed, contact us at Phillips Safety. Our Laser Department has technicians who can assist you in calculating the optical density of any laser and recommend the necessary filter or eye barrier. We also have online resources from which you can learn more about laser safety or laser eyewear.

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Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Laser safety glasses are an essential component for anyone who works with or in the vicinity of lasers.

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety GlassesThis use of lasers in industry, manufacture, construction, and the medical and dental fields has grown exponentially over the years, and the technicians, assistants, patients, medical personnel, assembly workers, and line workers who risk exposure must have proper eye protection in place.

Certain lasers – some more than others – pose a risk to the eye by emitting light that can burn the retina. Since the retina has no pain receptors, people do not feel this occur, thus they are not inclined to shade their eyes or pull away as the damage occurs. Depending on the type of light being emitted, they may not even be aware of the danger…until it’s too late. Retinal burns can happen over long periods of time or in the briefest of moments – again depending on the strength and wavelength of the laser inflicting the damage.

Symptoms of retinal eye damage include itching, burning eyes, the appearance of double-images, white or dark blotches, partial or complete loss of vision, and other physical and visual effects. In mild cases these effects are temporary as the burns heal. When too much damage is done and the retinal tissue cannot fully heal or it leaves behind scar tissue, the effects can be permanent.

The use of properly-matched laser safety glasses is critical in avoiding eye exposure to the damaging rays of a laser. These glasses work by filtering out the exact light wavelength or wavelengths of a particular laser and absorbing the light rays that, unfiltered, would damage the retina. In order to work properly, the glasses must be fitted with filtered lenses that match the optical density, or OD, of the laser in use. So how does one determine the optical density of a given laser?

The answer is a somewhat complicated formula that varies with the pulse mode of the laser. For constant wave lasers, the formula involves the wavelength and the output of power in watts; for single pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, and pulse width; for repetitive pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency.

To calculate the proper OD, the requisite laser statistics must be first be obtained. If you need to figure out optical density for a given laser, you have a few options to explore. Follow the guide below:

  • Consult the Laser’s Label or Manual – All commercially-available lasers should be labeled with the information necessary to determine the OD. It should be permanently mounted on a label or metal plate attached to the laser’s apparatus. If not, the manual or operating instructions should list the statistics.
  • Consult the Laser’s Manufacturer – If the above fails to provide precise information or the label/manual is lost or missing, consult the company that manufactured the laser for the exact statistics.
  • Use the Info to Calculate OD – several online sites offer free OD calculators in which you can input your laser’s vital statistics and have the calculation done for you.
  • Contact Phillips Safety – if unsure of how to proceed, contact us at Phillips Safety. Our Laser Department has technicians who can assist you in calculating the optical density of any laser and recommend the necessary filter or eye barrier. We also have online resources from which you can learn more about laser safety or laser eyewear.

Shop Laser Safety Glasses

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/calculate-optical-density-for-laser-safety-glasses/trackback/

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Laser safety glasses are an essential component for anyone who works with or in the vicinity of lasers.

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety GlassesThis use of lasers in industry, manufacture, construction, and the medical and dental fields has grown exponentially over the years, and the technicians, assistants, patients, medical personnel, assembly workers, and line workers who risk exposure must have proper eye protection in place.

Certain lasers – some more than others – pose a risk to the eye by emitting light that can burn the retina. Since the retina has no pain receptors, people do not feel this occur, thus they are not inclined to shade their eyes or pull away as the damage occurs. Depending on the type of light being emitted, they may not even be aware of the danger…until it’s too late. Retinal burns can happen over long periods of time or in the briefest of moments – again depending on the strength and wavelength of the laser inflicting the damage.

Symptoms of retinal eye damage include itching, burning eyes, the appearance of double-images, white or dark blotches, partial or complete loss of vision, and other physical and visual effects. In mild cases these effects are temporary as the burns heal. When too much damage is done and the retinal tissue cannot fully heal or it leaves behind scar tissue, the effects can be permanent.

The use of properly-matched laser safety glasses is critical in avoiding eye exposure to the damaging rays of a laser. These glasses work by filtering out the exact light wavelength or wavelengths of a particular laser and absorbing the light rays that, unfiltered, would damage the retina. In order to work properly, the glasses must be fitted with filtered lenses that match the optical density, or OD, of the laser in use. So how does one determine the optical density of a given laser?

The answer is a somewhat complicated formula that varies with the pulse mode of the laser. For constant wave lasers, the formula involves the wavelength and the output of power in watts; for single pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, and pulse width; for repetitive pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency.

To calculate the proper OD, the requisite laser statistics must be first be obtained. If you need to figure out optical density for a given laser, you have a few options to explore. Follow the guide below:

  • Consult the Laser’s Label or Manual – All commercially-available lasers should be labeled with the information necessary to determine the OD. It should be permanently mounted on a label or metal plate attached to the laser’s apparatus. If not, the manual or operating instructions should list the statistics.
  • Consult the Laser’s Manufacturer – If the above fails to provide precise information or the label/manual is lost or missing, consult the company that manufactured the laser for the exact statistics.
  • Use the Info to Calculate OD – several online sites offer free OD calculators in which you can input your laser’s vital statistics and have the calculation done for you.
  • Contact Phillips Safety – if unsure of how to proceed, contact us at Phillips Safety. Our Laser Department has technicians who can assist you in calculating the optical density of any laser and recommend the necessary filter or eye barrier. We also have online resources from which you can learn more about laser safety or laser eyewear.

Shop Laser Safety Glasses

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/calculate-optical-density-for-laser-safety-glasses/trackback/

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Laser safety glasses are an essential component for anyone who works with or in the vicinity of lasers.

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety Glasses

Calculate Optical Density for Laser Safety GlassesThis use of lasers in industry, manufacture, construction, and the medical and dental fields has grown exponentially over the years, and the technicians, assistants, patients, medical personnel, assembly workers, and line workers who risk exposure must have proper eye protection in place.

Certain lasers – some more than others – pose a risk to the eye by emitting light that can burn the retina. Since the retina has no pain receptors, people do not feel this occur, thus they are not inclined to shade their eyes or pull away as the damage occurs. Depending on the type of light being emitted, they may not even be aware of the danger…until it’s too late. Retinal burns can happen over long periods of time or in the briefest of moments – again depending on the strength and wavelength of the laser inflicting the damage.

Symptoms of retinal eye damage include itching, burning eyes, the appearance of double-images, white or dark blotches, partial or complete loss of vision, and other physical and visual effects. In mild cases these effects are temporary as the burns heal. When too much damage is done and the retinal tissue cannot fully heal or it leaves behind scar tissue, the effects can be permanent.

The use of properly-matched laser safety glasses is critical in avoiding eye exposure to the damaging rays of a laser. These glasses work by filtering out the exact light wavelength or wavelengths of a particular laser and absorbing the light rays that, unfiltered, would damage the retina. In order to work properly, the glasses must be fitted with filtered lenses that match the optical density, or OD, of the laser in use. So how does one determine the optical density of a given laser?

The answer is a somewhat complicated formula that varies with the pulse mode of the laser. For constant wave lasers, the formula involves the wavelength and the output of power in watts; for single pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, and pulse width; for repetitive pulse lasers, the wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse width, and pulse repetition frequency.

To calculate the proper OD, the requisite laser statistics must be first be obtained. If you need to figure out optical density for a given laser, you have a few options to explore. Follow the guide below:

  • Consult the Laser’s Label or Manual – All commercially-available lasers should be labeled with the information necessary to determine the OD. It should be permanently mounted on a label or metal plate attached to the laser’s apparatus. If not, the manual or operating instructions should list the statistics.
  • Consult the Laser’s Manufacturer – If the above fails to provide precise information or the label/manual is lost or missing, consult the company that manufactured the laser for the exact statistics.
  • Use the Info to Calculate OD – several online sites offer free OD calculators in which you can input your laser’s vital statistics and have the calculation done for you.
  • Contact Phillips Safety – if unsure of how to proceed, contact us at Phillips Safety. Our Laser Department has technicians who can assist you in calculating the optical density of any laser and recommend the necessary filter or eye barrier. We also have online resources from which you can learn more about laser safety or laser eyewear.

Shop Laser Safety Glasses

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/calculate-optical-density-for-laser-safety-glasses/trackback/