Are Safety Glasses Really Necessary for Laser Pointers?

When laser pointers first hit the market, they were a novelty. Everyone loved them. It’s likely you or someone you know spent some time playing with one of the small, red laser pointers you could pick up at almost any office supply or general store. You may have even terrorized your cat, but unlike the laser point of yesteryear, today’s laser pointers can be extremely powerful and harmful. The question is do you really need to wear safety glasses when using a laser pointer?

How Does a Laser Pointer Work?

The first step in answering the question is understanding how a laser pointer works. A laser pointer is small devices that emits a beam of light. This light projects a small colored dot onto a surface. You’ve most likely seen them used during presentations to point a specific point or word on a slide show.

The word laser is actual an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. The radiation is actually the light that is produced by the laser. Normally, this light can be seen, but some lasers actually emit light that is invisible to the human eye.

Lasers are composed of three parts, the lasing medium, a source of energy, and a resonator. The medium is a material that can be energized by a source like electricity or batteries to a higher energy state. After the medium becomes energized, it is then released as monochromatic radiation. The resonator is the area where the energy is built up before it can be released. In simple lasers, such as a laser pointer, the resonator is normally a pair of mirrors that is positioned at the end of the lasing medium. The mirrors work in a pair with one mirror being completely reflective while the other mirror is only partially reflective. This forces the light to reflect back and forth until it aligns itself to a single direction producing the coherent light your see emitted from the laser.

Red or Green

Laser pointers are most often seen in two colors. These are red and green. The red or ruby laser projects a red beam of light creating a red dot. This is produced by a ruby rod located inside of the laser that acts as the lasing medium. When the button on the side of the laser pointer, the flash tube located at the end of the rod agitate the atoms inside of the rod. These atoms begin to bounce off the mirrors and eventually exit the pointer to create the red dot.

The green laser works almost identically with one key exception, a green rod is used to create a green dot. The ruby rod at the end of the tube is replace with a green rod that will then emit a green beam of light. It’s important to note that the green rod is capable of producing a much more focused and powerful light beam than the ruby rod. In turn, this creates a more dangerous laser.

What are the Dangers?

If you are utilizing a cheap red laser you can pick up at and gas station or dollar store run by nothing but an AA battery, it’s highly unlikely there is any danger at all associated with its use. However, larger lasers can actually produce several dangers.

In general, laser pointers are incapable of causing permanent eye damage, but they have been known to cause temporary scotoma or blind spots and flash blindness. This can occur when the laser is aimed at a person’s eye. The laser’s light is concentrated into a single narrow beam to start with, but when that light reaches a person’s lens it is further concentrated and becomes a single powerful dot on the retina. This temporary blindness can last from a few seconds to minutes. Many of the worst injuries related to laser pointers occur as a side effect of this temporary blindness.

Prolonged exposure to lasers even when not pointed directly at the eye is capable of causing fatigue and eye irritation. This is especially common in those who work with lasers every day.

Safety

Using common sense with a laser pointer is the simplest way to ensure safety. Never point a laser at a person’s head or eyes no matter the distance. Remember lasers travel long distances without losing power. Secondly, if you work with a laser pointer or use one often, consider investing in a pair of safety glasses. This is especially important if you are using a green laser. Laser Safety glasses for red laser pointers should provide protection for 615nm-700nm wavelengths. For green lasers, look for glasses specially designed for green lasers, such as the Laser Strike Blue/ Green/ Red Beam Reduction Glasses, these provide protection for green lasers as well as complete protection from all red laser pointer hazards.

While safety glasses are not required every time you pick up a laser pointer for entertainment or for a quick presentation, they are highly recommended for anyone who has frequent contact with lasers. Investing in a quality pair of laser safety goggles will protect your eyes from any possible damage, fatigue, and blindness. The flash blindness caused by deliberately or accidental pointing a laser into the eyes is dangerous and could be fatal in certain situation. Always use caution and never point a laser at a mirror like surface.

To browse the many varieties of safety glasses available for lasers, contact Phillips Safety Products today.

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Are Safety Glasses Really Necessary for Laser Pointers?

When laser pointers first hit the market, they were a novelty. Everyone loved them. It’s likely you or someone you know spent some time playing with one of the small, red laser pointers you could pick up at almost any office supply or general store. You may have even terrorized your cat, but unlike the laser point of yesteryear, today’s laser pointers can be extremely powerful and harmful. The question is do you really need to wear safety glasses when using a laser pointer?

How Does a Laser Pointer Work?

The first step in answering the question is understanding how a laser pointer works. A laser pointer is small devices that emits a beam of light. This light projects a small colored dot onto a surface. You’ve most likely seen them used during presentations to point a specific point or word on a slide show.

The word laser is actual an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. The radiation is actually the light that is produced by the laser. Normally, this light can be seen, but some lasers actually emit light that is invisible to the human eye.

Lasers are composed of three parts, the lasing medium, a source of energy, and a resonator. The medium is a material that can be energized by a source like electricity or batteries to a higher energy state. After the medium becomes energized, it is then released as monochromatic radiation. The resonator is the area where the energy is built up before it can be released. In simple lasers, such as a laser pointer, the resonator is normally a pair of mirrors that is positioned at the end of the lasing medium. The mirrors work in a pair with one mirror being completely reflective while the other mirror is only partially reflective. This forces the light to reflect back and forth until it aligns itself to a single direction producing the coherent light your see emitted from the laser.

Red or Green

Laser pointers are most often seen in two colors. These are red and green. The red or ruby laser projects a red beam of light creating a red dot. This is produced by a ruby rod located inside of the laser that acts as the lasing medium. When the button on the side of the laser pointer, the flash tube located at the end of the rod agitate the atoms inside of the rod. These atoms begin to bounce off the mirrors and eventually exit the pointer to create the red dot.

The green laser works almost identically with one key exception, a green rod is used to create a green dot. The ruby rod at the end of the tube is replace with a green rod that will then emit a green beam of light. It’s important to note that the green rod is capable of producing a much more focused and powerful light beam than the ruby rod. In turn, this creates a more dangerous laser.

What are the Dangers?

If you are utilizing a cheap red laser you can pick up at and gas station or dollar store run by nothing but an AA battery, it’s highly unlikely there is any danger at all associated with its use. However, larger lasers can actually produce several dangers.

In general, laser pointers are incapable of causing permanent eye damage, but they have been known to cause temporary scotoma or blind spots and flash blindness. This can occur when the laser is aimed at a person’s eye. The laser’s light is concentrated into a single narrow beam to start with, but when that light reaches a person’s lens it is further concentrated and becomes a single powerful dot on the retina. This temporary blindness can last from a few seconds to minutes. Many of the worst injuries related to laser pointers occur as a side effect of this temporary blindness.

Prolonged exposure to lasers even when not pointed directly at the eye is capable of causing fatigue and eye irritation. This is especially common in those who work with lasers every day.

Safety

Using common sense with a laser pointer is the simplest way to ensure safety. Never point a laser at a person’s head or eyes no matter the distance. Remember lasers travel long distances without losing power. Secondly, if you work with a laser pointer or use one often, consider investing in a pair of safety glasses. This is especially important if you are using a green laser. Laser Safety glasses for red laser pointers should provide protection for 615nm-700nm wavelengths. For green lasers, look for glasses specially designed for green lasers, such as the Laser Strike Blue/ Green/ Red Beam Reduction Glasses, these provide protection for green lasers as well as complete protection from all red laser pointer hazards.

While safety glasses are not required every time you pick up a laser pointer for entertainment or for a quick presentation, they are highly recommended for anyone who has frequent contact with lasers. Investing in a quality pair of laser safety goggles will protect your eyes from any possible damage, fatigue, and blindness. The flash blindness caused by deliberately or accidental pointing a laser into the eyes is dangerous and could be fatal in certain situation. Always use caution and never point a laser at a mirror like surface.

To browse the many varieties of safety glasses available for lasers, contact Phillips Safety Products today.

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Are Safety Glasses Really Necessary for Laser Pointers?

When laser pointers first hit the market, they were a novelty. Everyone loved them. It’s likely you or someone you know spent some time playing with one of the small, red laser pointers you could pick up at almost any office supply or general store. You may have even terrorized your cat, but unlike the laser point of yesteryear, today’s laser pointers can be extremely powerful and harmful. The question is do you really need to wear safety glasses when using a laser pointer?

How Does a Laser Pointer Work?

The first step in answering the question is understanding how a laser pointer works. A laser pointer is small devices that emits a beam of light. This light projects a small colored dot onto a surface. You’ve most likely seen them used during presentations to point a specific point or word on a slide show.

The word laser is actual an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. The radiation is actually the light that is produced by the laser. Normally, this light can be seen, but some lasers actually emit light that is invisible to the human eye.

Lasers are composed of three parts, the lasing medium, a source of energy, and a resonator. The medium is a material that can be energized by a source like electricity or batteries to a higher energy state. After the medium becomes energized, it is then released as monochromatic radiation. The resonator is the area where the energy is built up before it can be released. In simple lasers, such as a laser pointer, the resonator is normally a pair of mirrors that is positioned at the end of the lasing medium. The mirrors work in a pair with one mirror being completely reflective while the other mirror is only partially reflective. This forces the light to reflect back and forth until it aligns itself to a single direction producing the coherent light your see emitted from the laser.

Red or Green

Laser pointers are most often seen in two colors. These are red and green. The red or ruby laser projects a red beam of light creating a red dot. This is produced by a ruby rod located inside of the laser that acts as the lasing medium. When the button on the side of the laser pointer, the flash tube located at the end of the rod agitate the atoms inside of the rod. These atoms begin to bounce off the mirrors and eventually exit the pointer to create the red dot.

The green laser works almost identically with one key exception, a green rod is used to create a green dot. The ruby rod at the end of the tube is replace with a green rod that will then emit a green beam of light. It’s important to note that the green rod is capable of producing a much more focused and powerful light beam than the ruby rod. In turn, this creates a more dangerous laser.

What are the Dangers?

If you are utilizing a cheap red laser you can pick up at and gas station or dollar store run by nothing but an AA battery, it’s highly unlikely there is any danger at all associated with its use. However, larger lasers can actually produce several dangers.

In general, laser pointers are incapable of causing permanent eye damage, but they have been known to cause temporary scotoma or blind spots and flash blindness. This can occur when the laser is aimed at a person’s eye. The laser’s light is concentrated into a single narrow beam to start with, but when that light reaches a person’s lens it is further concentrated and becomes a single powerful dot on the retina. This temporary blindness can last from a few seconds to minutes. Many of the worst injuries related to laser pointers occur as a side effect of this temporary blindness.

Prolonged exposure to lasers even when not pointed directly at the eye is capable of causing fatigue and eye irritation. This is especially common in those who work with lasers every day.

Safety

Using common sense with a laser pointer is the simplest way to ensure safety. Never point a laser at a person’s head or eyes no matter the distance. Remember lasers travel long distances without losing power. Secondly, if you work with a laser pointer or use one often, consider investing in a pair of safety glasses. This is especially important if you are using a green laser. Laser Safety glasses for red laser pointers should provide protection for 615nm-700nm wavelengths. For green lasers, look for glasses specially designed for green lasers, such as the Laser Strike Blue/ Green/ Red Beam Reduction Glasses, these provide protection for green lasers as well as complete protection from all red laser pointer hazards.

While safety glasses are not required every time you pick up a laser pointer for entertainment or for a quick presentation, they are highly recommended for anyone who has frequent contact with lasers. Investing in a quality pair of laser safety goggles will protect your eyes from any possible damage, fatigue, and blindness. The flash blindness caused by deliberately or accidental pointing a laser into the eyes is dangerous and could be fatal in certain situation. Always use caution and never point a laser at a mirror like surface.

To browse the many varieties of safety glasses available for lasers, contact Phillips Safety Products today.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/are-safety-glasses-really-necessary-for-laser-pointers/trackback/

Are Safety Glasses Really Necessary for Laser Pointers?

When laser pointers first hit the market, they were a novelty. Everyone loved them. It’s likely you or someone you know spent some time playing with one of the small, red laser pointers you could pick up at almost any office supply or general store. You may have even terrorized your cat, but unlike the laser point of yesteryear, today’s laser pointers can be extremely powerful and harmful. The question is do you really need to wear safety glasses when using a laser pointer?

How Does a Laser Pointer Work?

The first step in answering the question is understanding how a laser pointer works. A laser pointer is small devices that emits a beam of light. This light projects a small colored dot onto a surface. You’ve most likely seen them used during presentations to point a specific point or word on a slide show.

The word laser is actual an acronym for light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. The radiation is actually the light that is produced by the laser. Normally, this light can be seen, but some lasers actually emit light that is invisible to the human eye.

Lasers are composed of three parts, the lasing medium, a source of energy, and a resonator. The medium is a material that can be energized by a source like electricity or batteries to a higher energy state. After the medium becomes energized, it is then released as monochromatic radiation. The resonator is the area where the energy is built up before it can be released. In simple lasers, such as a laser pointer, the resonator is normally a pair of mirrors that is positioned at the end of the lasing medium. The mirrors work in a pair with one mirror being completely reflective while the other mirror is only partially reflective. This forces the light to reflect back and forth until it aligns itself to a single direction producing the coherent light your see emitted from the laser.

Red or Green

Laser pointers are most often seen in two colors. These are red and green. The red or ruby laser projects a red beam of light creating a red dot. This is produced by a ruby rod located inside of the laser that acts as the lasing medium. When the button on the side of the laser pointer, the flash tube located at the end of the rod agitate the atoms inside of the rod. These atoms begin to bounce off the mirrors and eventually exit the pointer to create the red dot.

The green laser works almost identically with one key exception, a green rod is used to create a green dot. The ruby rod at the end of the tube is replace with a green rod that will then emit a green beam of light. It’s important to note that the green rod is capable of producing a much more focused and powerful light beam than the ruby rod. In turn, this creates a more dangerous laser.

What are the Dangers?

If you are utilizing a cheap red laser you can pick up at and gas station or dollar store run by nothing but an AA battery, it’s highly unlikely there is any danger at all associated with its use. However, larger lasers can actually produce several dangers.

In general, laser pointers are incapable of causing permanent eye damage, but they have been known to cause temporary scotoma or blind spots and flash blindness. This can occur when the laser is aimed at a person’s eye. The laser’s light is concentrated into a single narrow beam to start with, but when that light reaches a person’s lens it is further concentrated and becomes a single powerful dot on the retina. This temporary blindness can last from a few seconds to minutes. Many of the worst injuries related to laser pointers occur as a side effect of this temporary blindness.

Prolonged exposure to lasers even when not pointed directly at the eye is capable of causing fatigue and eye irritation. This is especially common in those who work with lasers every day.

Safety

Using common sense with a laser pointer is the simplest way to ensure safety. Never point a laser at a person’s head or eyes no matter the distance. Remember lasers travel long distances without losing power. Secondly, if you work with a laser pointer or use one often, consider investing in a pair of safety glasses. This is especially important if you are using a green laser. Laser Safety glasses for red laser pointers should provide protection for 615nm-700nm wavelengths. For green lasers, look for glasses specially designed for green lasers, such as the Laser Strike Blue/ Green/ Red Beam Reduction Glasses, these provide protection for green lasers as well as complete protection from all red laser pointer hazards.

While safety glasses are not required every time you pick up a laser pointer for entertainment or for a quick presentation, they are highly recommended for anyone who has frequent contact with lasers. Investing in a quality pair of laser safety goggles will protect your eyes from any possible damage, fatigue, and blindness. The flash blindness caused by deliberately or accidental pointing a laser into the eyes is dangerous and could be fatal in certain situation. Always use caution and never point a laser at a mirror like surface.

To browse the many varieties of safety glasses available for lasers, contact Phillips Safety Products today.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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Trackback URL http://lasersafetygoggles.com/are-safety-glasses-really-necessary-for-laser-pointers/trackback/